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UK Against Fluoridation

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Parliament

Photo of Mark PritchardMark Pritchard Conservative, The Wrekin

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will bring forward proposals to improve children's dental health to reduce the number of children admitted to hospital for dental extractions.

Photo of Jo ChurchillJo Churchill The Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Health and Social Care

The Government is committed to improving oral health, particularly of deprived children. Children’s oral health is now better than it has ever been, with over 75% of five-year olds in England now decay free.
Latest data from the NHS Outcomes Framework shows that the number of tooth extractions due to decay for children admitted as inpatients to hospital, aged 10 years and under has dropped from to 424.6 in 2017/18 to 409.4 in 2018/19 (a decrease of 3.6%).
The Government’s Green Paper, ‘Advancing our health: prevention in the 2020s’, published in July, committed to consulting on options for rolling out a national school toothbrushing scheme in more pre-school settings and primary schools, and to consulting on the role water companies can play to support a water fluoridation initiative in England. Both of these proposals will aim to improve the oral health of the most deprived children in all areas of the country and help to reduce the number of children needing tooth extractions.

No fluoride and sun gazing: Just a running tally of the false health claims made by Pete Evans.

Belinda Jepsen
Senior Features Writer

USA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Jan. 15, 2020
CONTACT: Lynn Sutfin, 517-241-2112
LANSING, Mich. – The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) announced today that 51 water systems have been awarded a Water Fluoridation Quality Award from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 
The award recognizes those communities that maintained a consistent level of optimally fluoridated water throughout 2018. A total of 1,656 water systems in 30 states received the award including the following Michigan systems:

I find this weird it's more important to know the water systems that failed to meet standards.
Seems like  a massive PR stunt.

Fluoridation: A 75-year-old Blunder

NEW YORKJan. 15, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Seventy-five years ago, dentists convinced government officials to experiment on every Grand Rapids, Michigan, resident without individual informed-consent to prove that (not if) dosing the municipal water supply with untested sodium-fluoride chemicals would decay-proof children's developing teeth. Planned to last 15 years, the 1945 study ended prematurely after 6 ½ years.  Teeth of most children born into the experiment hadn't even erupted yet. Muskegon, the planned non-fluoridated comparison city began fluoridating its water in 1951; thereby, negating the experiment. And, cavities declined in both cities, reports the New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation, Inc. (NYSCOF).
American Dental Association (ADA) news release says, "many communities did not wait for the studies to be completed before starting their own fluoridation efforts.  By 1950, [fluoridation] had the full support of the ADA." This support came without safety evidence.  
Grand Rapids citizens' health was untested. But Newburgh NY's healthy schoolchildren were examined in another 1945 human experiment, also cut short prematurely. Newburgh kids suffered more bone defects, anemia and earlier female menstruation after 10 years (Journal of the American Dental Association, 1956). These findings were dismissed.
In 1951, dentists strategized ("Proceedings 4th annual conference of state dental directors") on how to sell fluoridation using  misinformation and misdirection e.g. "We have told the public it works, so we can't go back on that." And "those research people, they can't get over their feeling that you have to have test tube and animal research before you start applying it to human beings."
Edward Bernays, the father of public relations, promoted fluoridation, consulting on strategy for the National Institute of Dental Research. "Selling fluoride was child's play," Bernays told the author of The Fluoride Deception. Bernays said citizens trust medical authority. Bernays convinced doctors who passed on their his fluoridation beliefs. Modern fluoridation PR flacks do the same.
Chemical & Engineering News reported: "Rational voices of opposition were suppressed from the start. Science justified those fears. Fluoride isn't a nutrient or required for healthy teeth and has serious side effects, rendering fluoridation unnecessary and harmful.
Attorney Paul Beeber, NYSCOF President says, "The ADA celebrates fluoridation, ignoring strong fluoride/brain links,100 years of damning fluoride/kidney thyroid research and that cavity experience and inequities increased in the last 20 years despite widespread fluoridation contributing to US children's fluoride-damaged teeth (fluorosis)," says Beeber.   
Contact: Paul Beeber, JD, 516-433-8882 nyscof@aol.com    Twitter @nyscof     
SOURCE New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation, Inc.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Plans to tackle dental problems in Sunderland

Plans to tackle dental problems on Wearside have been revealed following a council probe.

Last year, Sunderland City Council’s Health and Wellbeing Scrutiny Committee launched an investigation into oral health.

From August, councillors have been gathering evidence from a range of health experts, stakeholders and interested parties.

This included feedback on potentially introducing fluoride into the city’s water supply, which would be subject to public consultation and a lengthy legal process.

The committee rubber-stamped their draft report, with the findings set to be discussed by the council’s ruling cabinet next month.

A foreword from scrutiny committee chair, Coun Darryl Dixon, said the review was an important piece of work for the committee, council and people of Sunderland.

“We often take our teeth and oral health for granted, but they play a very important role in our lives,” the report reads.

“Teeth help us chew and digest food, they help us to talk and speak clearly and they also give our face its shape.

“Good oral health provides greater confidence for people as well as influencing our social lives, careers and our relationships.

“Maintaining good oral hygiene is also important in a person’s overall health. oral health research has linked gum disease to heart disease, premature birth and even knee arthritis.

“So oral health is extremely important not only to looking good but to feeling good too. “

According to a recent survey, 28.4% of five-year-olds in Sunderland examined had dental decay compared to 23.3% nationally.

The report added Sunderland is the second worst area in the North East behind Middlesbrough for five-year-olds with decay, missing or filled teeth, with “strong links” between decay and deprivation.

Any community water fluoridation (CWF) scheme on Wearside in future would impact supplies in County Durham and South Tyneside.

And experts have said introducing the naturally occurring mineral could reduce the number of people suffering cavities and also requires the least behavioural change.

As the issue is divisive, views from campaigners UK Freedom from Fluoride Alliance were also considered during the scrutiny review.

Concerns included “uncertainty over the benefits” and “removing freedom of choice for an entire population affected”.

Health scrutiny committee chair, Coun Darryl Dixon, has previously said fluoridation plans should be put to a “free vote” on the council.

The recommendation to cabinet adds the local authority should make an “appropriate determination” on the suitability of CWF based on “all the available evidence and representations.”

Coun Neil MacKnight, speaking at the health scrutiny meeting this week, added any consultation should be “robust and informed”.

“There’s a lot of people with preconceived ideas and quackery out there, we did look at the evidence and if it does go out to consultation it should be evidence driven,” he said.

Other plans to tackle oral health issues in Sunderland from the review include:

Developing an oral health strategy. Promoting more regular attendance at dentists. Targeted work for the most vulnerable such as homeless, elderly and those admitted to hospital. Backing the ‘dental check by one’ campaign to ensure all young children are seen by a dentist before their first birthday. Supervised tooth brushing schemes and fluoride varnish programmes for primary schools. Oral health promotion across early years services, maternity services, health and social care, local schools and nurseries.

10 hours ago - As a local municipality moves to remove fluoride from its water supply, the debate over health concerns of fluoridating water resurfaces.

I'm blocked from viewing.

Monday, January 13, 2020

10 hours ago - fluoridated water case, originally filed in 2017, is slated for an eight-day hearing in federal court in Berkeley, California, starting April 20. ... Gloucester resident Karen Favazza Spencer, a member of Food & Water Watch, was among those who testified. ... The groups appealed the EPA ...

I'm not able to see this only non EU

Sunday, January 12, 2020



Are they listening?

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Plans to tackle dental problems in Sunderland

Plans to tackle dental problems on Wearside have been revealed following a council probe.
By Chris Binding
Saturday, 11th January 2020, 8:00 am

Last year, Sunderland City Council’s Health and Wellbeing Scrutiny Committee launched an investigation into oral health.

From August, councillors have been gathering evidence from a range of health experts, stakeholders and interested parties.

This included feedback on potentially introducing fluoride into the city’s water supply, which would be subject to public consultation and a lengthy legal process.

The committee rubber-stamped their draft report, with the findings set to be discussed by the council’s ruling cabinet next month.

A foreword from scrutiny committee chair, Coun Darryl Dixon, said the review was an important piece of work for the committee, council and people of Sunderland.

“We often take our teeth and oral health for granted, but they play a very important role in our lives,” the report reads.

“Teeth help us chew and digest food, they help us to talk and speak clearly and they also give our face its shape.

“Good oral health provides greater confidence for people as well as influencing our social lives, careers and our relationships.

“Maintaining good oral hygiene is also important in a person’s overall health. oral health research has linked gum disease to heart disease, premature birth and even knee arthritis.

“So oral health is extremely important not only to looking good but to feeling good too. “

According to a recent survey, 28.4% of five-year-olds in Sunderland examined had dental decay compared to 23.3% nationally.

The report added Sunderland is the second worst area in the North East behind Middlesbrough for five-year-olds with decay, missing or filled teeth, with “strong links” between decay and deprivation.

Any community water fluoridation (CWF) scheme on Wearside in future would impact supplies in County Durham and South Tyneside.

And experts have said introducing the naturally occurring mineral could reduce the number of people suffering cavities and also requires the least behavioural change.

As the issue is divisive, views from campaigners UK Freedom from Fluoride Alliance were also considered during the scrutiny review.

Concerns included “uncertainty over the benefits” and “removing freedom of choice for an entire population affected”.

Health scrutiny committee chair, Coun Darryl Dixon, has previously said fluoridation plans should be put to a “free vote” on the council.

The recommendation to cabinet adds the local authority should make an “appropriate determination” on the suitability of CWF based on “all the available evidence and representations.”

Coun Neil MacKnight, speaking at the health scrutiny meeting this week, added any consultation should be “robust and informed”.

“There’s a lot of people with preconceived ideas and quackery out there, we did look at the evidence and if it does go out to consultation it should be evidence driven,” he said.

Other plans to tackle oral health issues in Sunderland from the review include:

Developing an oral health strategy. Promoting more regular attendance at dentists. Targeted work for the most vulnerable such as homeless, elderly and those admitted to hospital. Backing the ‘dental check by one’ campaign to ensure all young children are seen by a dentist before their first birthday. Supervised tooth brushing schemes and fluoride varnish programmes for primary schools. Oral health promotion across early years services, maternity services, health and social care, local schools and nurseries.

USA - Water supplier for township in York County starts process to drop fluoride

Fluoride has long been regarded as one of the best ways to fight cavities.
More than 60 years ago, suppliers started adding it to public water to protect children’s teeth as they matured.
Over the years, fluoride started to pop up in more and more products – toothpaste, dental rinses, mouthwashes – and cities, towns and municipalities started to remove it from their water.
The American Dental Association reported in 2018 that 74 cities voted to remove fluoride from their drinking water since 2013. More than a dozen cities voted on the change in 2019.
Shiloh Water Authority, which serves West Manchester Township in York County, has started the process to remove fluoride from its water.
More: PA state lawmakers must protect our environment this year
More: York County restaurant inspections: Wendy's, New Lucky Seven out
Shiloh is one of the last water companies in York County to add fluoride. According to a database by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, the others are Hanover Municipal Water Works, Red Lion Municipal Authority and the West Manheim branch of the York Water Company (this was purchased by York Water in 2008 under an agreement to continue to fluoridate the water).
Adams County is one of 19 counties in Pennsylvania that does not have a supplier that adds fluoride or purchases fluoridated water. Franklin has three authorities and Lebanon has two that add fluoride to their community’s water.
Chairman James Bentzel said Shiloh started to add fluoride to the water in the mid-1960s. In the last few years some of its customers requested that the company stop.
“There are a lot of products out there where they can get fluoride,” Bentzel said Thursday. “Some customers are concerned that they are getting too much fluoride.”
And Bentzel said fluoride isn’t easy to get rid of once it’s added to the water. Unlike chlorine, which dissipates from the water, you need a special purifying system to get rid of the fluoride.
An advisory has gone out in Birmingham about lead levels in the drinking water.
U.S. EPA
Approximately 60-70 people attended a public hearing about Shiloh’s decision, Bentzel said. He said the authority serves approximately 10,000 people through 3,800 meters.
Pennsylvania’s DEP shows on its website that it received an application on Nov. 15, 2019 from the West Manchester Township Authority to “remove and cease adding hydrofluosilicic acid at each entry point.”
The authority officially advertised its intent to remove fluoride from its water supply on Dec. 21, 2019, giving residents until Jan. 21, 2020 to voice comments to the DEP. Those comments will be used by the state agency in the final consideration of the application.
Bentzel said if the DEP approves the application, the fluoride could be stopped in as little as 30 days.
“We have to send letters to notify our customers of the cutoff date,” Bentzel said. “It’s a simple process on our end.”
In an opinion piece to the York Daily Record, officials of Healthy York County Coalition are urging West Manchester Township residents to contact DEP and voice their opposition to Shiloh’s change.
“Removing fluoride is a step backwards, a decision that will negatively affect the long-term dental and physical health of children and adults served by Shiloh Water System,” Chair Jenny Englerth and Coordinator Deborah Gogniat write.
Shelly Stallsmith is a trends reporter for the York Daily Record. She can be reached at mstallsmith@ydr.com or followed on Twitter at @ShelStallsmith.

Friday, January 10, 2020

https://www.doctoroz.com/episode/are-your-silver-fillings-making-you-sick

Video, danger of mercury by Dr OZ

Thursday, January 09, 2020


A Wills 

15:47 (16 minutes ago)
Daily Telegraph 9.1.20  “PATIENTS ‘AT RISK OF BLINDNESS’ AS WAITING TIMES FOR SPECIALISTS GROWS”
Patients are going blind because they have to wait too long to see an eye specialist, NHS investigators warn.  The watchdog says 22 patients a month suffer severe or permanent sight loss as the NHS struggles to cope with rising demand.  “The Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch” said delays were having a “devastating” effect, such as a 34-year-old mother of 3 now unable to properly care for her young children who has never been able to see her baby.  She went blind after successive hospital appointment delays over 13 months at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust.  16 glaucoma patients went blind.
(My comment:  Glaucoma can usually be treated to prevent sight loss by daily eye drops at home to reduce eye pressure.  My friend’s mother-in-law went blind after the hospital kept cancelling or mixing up her appointments.)

My wife was given an appointment for December last year but I contacted a volunteer group set up to help patients. I appealed to them for help as she was going blind and kept tripping over pavements.
By the time of the first appointment both her cataracts were removed and she has better eyesight than me. It's a shame the mother didn't  do as I did.



Wednesday, January 08, 2020



Why do they keep using the word s--t all the time?

Tuesday, January 07, 2020

Dr. Ruscio Radio: Health, Nutrition and Functional Medicine

Fluoride In Water Linked To Hypothyroidism

 10:15 
  
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By Dr. Michael Ruscio. Discovered by Player FM and our community — copyright is owned by the publisher, not Player FM, and audio is streamed directly from their servers. Hit the Subscribe button to track updates in Player FM, or paste the feed URL into other podcast apps.
Excess fluoride from fluorinated drinking water has been linked to hypothyroidism in a recent systematic review (a high-quality summary of many studies). The review also found that the fluoride had other health effects like dental and skeletal fluorosis. Fluoride may disrupt the thyroid by inhibiting the ability of iodine to function in the body. Other sources of fluoride include processed beverages and foods, Teflon pans, and pesticides. Best steps to take: filter your water and focus on healthy nutrients. See the video for more details. https://drruscio.com/?p=48762

Monday, January 06, 2020

Friday, January 03, 2020

Board asks the question over water fluoridation

Board asks the question over water fluoridation

LOOKING INTO IT: The dental debate led the board to ask officers to explore the possibility of fluoridating water supplies
A DEBATE on children’s dental health ended with a request to council officers to explore the possibility of whether water supplies could be fluoridated.
Acknowledging it is a controversial subject, members of Calderdale Council’s Children and Young People’s Scrutiny Board thought it was nevertheless an option worth exloring.
Coun Stephen Baines (Con, Northowram and Shelf) proposed officers be asked whether the council could consult with the public about the possibility of fluoridation. Coun Silvia Dacre (Lab, Todmorden) supported the proposal – and board members agreed the request to explore the possibility of fluoridation should be made.
Coun Marilyn Greenwood (Lib Dem, Greetland and Stainland) said NHS dentistry provision was another key issue – on looking on behalf of someone who had just moved into Calderdale she said she found there were no NHS dental health appointments available in Calderdale, though one or two had arisen since. Many practices would not take children at all resulting in oral health problems requiring extractions surgical procedure when teeth were in such a poor condition. It was important to explore all aspects which could improve children’s oral health, she said.
Board members heard that Calderdale compared favourably with the Yorkshire and
Humber average on a range of childhood oral health outcomes, but there remained scope for improvement. Within the borough there appeared to be a correlation between poor oral health and deprivation which in turn correlates with dental access in the under fives.
A presentation, by Assistant
Director for Child Health Improvement, Ben Leaman, with dental public health expert Stefan Serban of Leeds University, revealed that the council undertakes many of the recommended and evidence-based interventions. But Calderdale is one of the worst authorities regionally when it comes to applying fluoride varnish to children’s teeth, one of the interventions which can help protect their teeth. Statistics presented showed water fluoridation provides a universal programme of protection, especially over time.
MORE COUNCIL STORIES: www.halifaxcourier.co.uk

The best water filter jugs – as tested by experts

“Water is the new frontier,” says Dr Rita Palandrani, a member of the UK Sommelier Association. Palandrani is one of a small but increasing number of expert tasters who are preoccupied with the quality and flavour of H2O – that hydrating compound which makes up 60pc of the human body.

Yes, there really is such a thing as a water sommelier. In the US, water sommelier Martin Riese has made headlines by dreaming up a 44-page water pairing menu at Ray’s & Stark Bar, a restaurant at the Los Angeles Country Museum of Art. And it appears the trend is growing: take a look at water connoisseur website finewaters.com and you quickly learn that there is a blossoming community dedicated to learning about the natural elixir that makes its way from mountains to mouths.

Now, if all this sounds somewhat 'out there' to you, then you're not alone: I confess I did a double take when I started researching the world of water tasting for this article. But as I sit around a big table full of colourless glasses, ready to embark on a test to find the best water filter jugs on the market, the experts assure me that this is serious stuff. "Water has a terroir, like wine, and it can improve the epicurean experience,” says Dr Palandrani, a member of The Fine Water Academy. "The taste is determined by the minerals it contains."...................

Thursday, January 02, 2020

F.A.N. Newsletter

First, from all of us at FAN, we would like to wish all our supporters and their families a happy and successful New Year. Which for most of us would mean winning our TSCA lawsuit scheduled to begin April 20, 2020. Just in case you missed it here is a link to Michael Connett's video statement from Dec 31.
The last day of our fundraiser was a real heartwarming experience. Donations flowed in throughout the day and it was clear that many of you - like us - saw reaching a 1000 donations as the key issue. Several of you gave more than once and whole families got involved. It was very exciting this end. Your indomitable spirit was tangible. We received 118 donations in all. The Olson family finally put us over the top just 8 minutes before midnight (EDT)! Thank you all so much
Although we fell well below our ambitious goal of raising $250,000 to cover our operating costs for 2020, it was quite understandable considering we had already had a successful fundraiser in the Spring to cover extra costs for our TSCA lawsuit.
Our final tally (as of January 1) was $137,103 from 1010 supporters. While we are not discouraging further contributions, tax deductions will no longer apply for 2019 purposes.
We still have a lot of things to do this end so please be patient with us as we endeavor to send out thank you letters to all those who sent in donations by mail.
Again a Happy New Year to all our FAN supporters in the USA, Australia, Canada, Ireland, Israel, Japan, New Zealand and the UK.
Sincerely,
Paul, Ellen, Michael, Stuart, Jay, Dawna, Chris, Rick, Carol, Bill Hirzy, Bill Osmunson and the rest of the AEHSP board of directors

5G, vaccines and fluoride: windmills they’re not

Sometimes it’s nice to be recognized as a scientist or a doctor. After studying the sciences for more than 45 years and having my clinical practice for more than 35 years, I feel that I have at least put my time in.

During that time, I have not put any focus into windmills. Some of my ancestors may be disappointed in that since I am of Dutch ancestry.

My focus has been to look at the different stressors that have a negative impact on our health. People are sicker and more stressed than ever before. Constant chronic low grade physical, chemical, emotional, toxic, and electromagnetic forces are creating harmful effects on the brain and the body.

An increasing number of scientists and doctors are becoming more aware of the stressful world that we are living in and the devastating effects it is having on our health.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the leader of the Children’s Health Defense, is leading the way and pushing for children’s health, justice, medical freedom and truth. He has had victories against Monsanto.

In looking for answers for the increase in cancers, autoimmune diseases, neurological dysfunctions, and numerous diseases, some issues are blatantly clear.

Questions concerning 5G, fluoride, vaccines, and their lack of safety studies are becoming obvious concerns for those who have investigated these topics.

As RFK Jr. has stated, “The greatest crisis that America faces today is the chronic disease epidemic in America’s children.”

Windmills are not that big of an issue compared to these.

Tom Lankering

Fluoride Exposure Linked to Changes in Sleep Cycle, Study Suggests

Alison Rodriguez
Water fluoride concentrations were associated with higher odds of reports of snorting, gasping, or stopping breathing while sleeping at night.
Fluoride exposure may be associated with changes in sleep cycle regulation and sleep behaviors among older adolescents, according to a study published in Environmental Health.

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was collected in order to analyze adolescents who had plasma fluoride and water fluoride measures and were not prescribed medication for sleep disorders. The researchers also investigated relationships between fluoride exposure and self-reported sleep patterns or daytime sleepiness.

“Many benefits of fluoride have been reported for oral health and it is regarded as a major public health achievement,” noted the authors. “Fluoride from environmental sources accumulates preferentially in the pineal gland which produces melatonin, the hormone that regulates the sleep-wake cycle. However, the effects of fluoride on sleep regulation remain unknown."

The research assessed adolescents at an average age of 17. The data revealed that the median (IQR) water fluoride concentration was 0.27 mg/L and the IQR plasma fluoride concentration was 0.29 μmol/L, respectively. Furthermore, an IQR increase in water fluoride was associated with 1.97 times higher odds of reporting symptoms suggestive of sleep apnea, according to the study. The increase in water fluoride was also associated with a later bedtime by 24 minutes, a later morning wake time by 26 minutes, and among males, a 38% reduction in the odds of reporting snoring.

The results also explained that water fluoride concentrations were associated with higher odds of reports of snorting, gasping, or stopping breathing while sleeping at night. Some of the data suggested higher water fluoride concentrations may be associated with frequent daytime sleepiness, however, more studies would be necessary to confirm.

“The high accumulation of fluoride in pineal gland hydroxyapatite (among those chronically exposed) points to a plausible mechanism by which fluoride may influence sleep patterns. In adults, pineal gland fluoride concentrations have been shown to strongly correlate with degree of pineal gland calcification,” explained the authors. “Interestingly, greater degree of pineal calcification among older adolescents and/or adults is associated with decreased melatonin production, lower REM sleep percentage, decreased total sleep time, poorer sleep efficiency, greater sleep disturbances and greater daytime tiredness.”

The authors suggest additional studies to be conducted in order to investigate the effects of fluoride on sleep patterns and to identify windows of vulnerability for potential effects.