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UK Against Fluoridation

Monday, September 26, 2016

Doug Cross's view on Syria's conflict

Water is life – but in Syria, it is also death.
Incidents of accidental contamination of public water supplies (the Camelford Poisoning) and deliberate contamination aimed at promoting health (fluoridation) attract controversy and even fury. But the targeting of water pumping stations, hospitals and medical facilities and supplies in Syria by Putin and al-Assad is different. These attacks are NOT separate random assaults on vulnerable targets, but part of a deliberate strategy to produce a lethal environment that will kill thousands of their opponents, and demoralise many of those who survive, even if only briefly.
This evil practice constitutes a new form of biological warfare, in which modern technology - aircarft able to deliver their missiles against 'soft' targets with unprecedented precision - are deployed to let loose biological agents that are already present but under control (marginally, perhaps) in the war zone. They may argue that this is not biological warfare, because they do not manufacture the deadly agents, nor deliver them in their missiles, but such wrangling is despicable. Their actions are in flagrant defiance of both the Geneva Convention and Article 1 of the Convention Prohibiting Biological Weapons. Spineless politicans wring their hands but remain silent, so for a less inhibited commentary, see Doug Cross' article on his web site, www.ukcaf.org

Doug



Fluoride 101 With Activist Ashley Jessica

NZ - Healthy Habits Aotearoa group to focus on positive solutions to health problems

Sara Cooper is a member of Healthy Habits Aotearoa, promoting health through reinforcing positive habits like brushing ...Sara Cooper is a member of Healthy Habits Aotearoa, promoting health through reinforcing positive habits like brushing teeth. Her son Will Cooper demonstrates his teeth brushing skills.

A grassroots organisation is forming in Nelson to combat the rising rates of tooth decay and obesity in children. 
Healthy Habits Aotearoa has been started by a group of people who believe that working with children to reinforce positive habits will help to address a range of health problems. 
Healthy Habits Aotearoa board chair Trevor Lawrence said that concerns over the potential water fluoridation in the region had sparked the group's formation.
The Fluoride Free Nelson group was evolving to become Healthy Habits Aotearoa as Lawrence said they wanted to be part of an effective solution to address the issue of tooth decay. Lawrence used to work as a psychotherapist and said as a grandparent, he now had more time on his hands. He said the Childsmile programme implemented in Scotland to combat rising rates of tooth decay was an example of how focusing on habits could improve health outcomes. 
Starting at pre-school age, children had supervised tooth brushing sessions and were given dental care packs to practice at home. There were also a range of preventative care interventions for children who were at increased risk of dental disease. Lawrence said the group were keen to recruit volunteers and implement some of the same techniques here. 
While Healthy Habits Aotearoa was still in its inception phase, one of the first initiatives would be to work with the breakfast club at Victory School to demonstrate tooth brushing and hand washing. The aim was then to expand out into other schools. "It's not about inventing the wheel, it's about working with what is already there," Lawrence said. "It's about being proactive and preventative."
Healthy Habits Aotearoa member Sara Cooper said a focus on educating children with health, hygiene, nutrition and fitness habits would not only improve rates of tooth decay, but it would also address other health issues like obesity and diabetes. 
With a background in fitness and exercise science, she said it was important that people took ownership for their health and she was keen to be part of a solution in the region. 
"There is a need to protect the water that flows into our homes, that will always be necessary," she said. "We also have a very real need for a solution to our vast array of health issues. 
Hampden Street School principal Don McLean said he thought that demonstrating tooth brushing in schools was a good idea. When he became principal at Hampden Street nine years ago, the school had a dental clinic, and the dental nurses used to do teeth brushing demonstrations for the students which had been very successful.
He said now the kids had to visit a centralised dental clinic with their parents they were no longer given the same assistance. 
"All our kids would benefit from learning how to brush their teeth properly because kids don't know how to do that, they don't have the dexterity when they are young enough to do it properly so they need to learn how to do it properly."
He said it was important to demonstrate to kids and send the message home but parents needed to be encouraged and reminded that they had a role to play too.
"At the end of the day it should be parents who say to their kids, go and brush your teeth before you go to bed."
Healthy Habits Aotearoa are holding an event, Hear the Solution and Vote 2016 on Friday September 30, 6pm at 107 Nile St, Nelson for those who want learn more about the organisation. 
 - Stuff



Toothpaste Makers Increase IQ Crushing Fluoride Dose

Study confirms that fluoride causes weight gain and depression

Water fluoridation(NaturalNews) The debate over water fluoridation goes back to the 1940s when communities began fluoridating water to prevent tooth decay. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the fluoridation of water was one of the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century.

Fluoride is a natural mineral found in soil and water in varying amounts. It is believed to combat tooth decay and cavities by making enamel more resistant to bacteria. However, previous studies have shown that exposure to high levels of fluoride inhibits the production of iodine, which is crucial for a healthy thyroid.

It is for this reason that adding extra fluoride to water for the purpose of medical treatment has become a controversial topic of heated debate. For decades, fluoride has been forced upon us by governments who have spiked our drinking water to improve oral health. However, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that fluoride-spiked water may do more harm than good.

Is fluoridated water better for oral health or not?

This forced medicine has been shown to increase the risk of hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid. An underactive thyroid gland fails to produce enough hormones, which may result in extreme fatigue, aching muscles, obesity, memory loss and depression.

A study published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health found that certain areas of England with fluoridated community water had increased rates of hypothyroidism. It was one of the largest studies to examine the adverse effects of elevated fluoride exposure.

The scientists discovered that areas with fluoridated water – such as the West Midlands and the North East of England – were 30 percent more likely to develop hypothyroidism than communities with low, natural levels of fluoride in their water. The scientists from the University of Kent warned that around 15,000 people in the U.K. could be suffering from preventable depression, fatigue, memory loss or weight gain.

"The difference between the West Midlands, which fluoridates, and Manchester, which doesn't was particularly striking. There were nearly double the number of cases in the West Midlands," lead author Professor Stephen Peckham of the Centre for Health Service Studies said.

He added that an underactive thyroid is a particularly nasty thing to have, and it can lead to other long-term health problems. Women in particular should be concerned, as they are 15 times more likely than men to develop the condition.

Professor Peckham further noted that councils need to reconsider putting fluoride in the water, and added that there are far better and safer ways to improve the dental health of citizens.

As the case against fluoride continues to grow, for your thyroid's sake, don't trust your water supply and filter your drinking water before use.

Nearly 70 percent of Americans at risk of fluoride poisoning

As reported by Holistic Dentistry, fluoride is added to approximately 10 percent of England's drinking water, while two-thirds of America's tap water is spiked with the chemical to prevent cavities.

In 2014, Public Health England released a report saying fluoride was a "safe and effective" way of improving dental health. Despite the fact that there is little evidence that communities with fluoridated water have fewer cavities than communities without, governments keep pushing this thyroid damaging chemical on us.

Holistic Dentistry added that the results of the study shouldn't be too surprising, given that fluoride was actually used in the 1950s to treat hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid. If fluoride can be used to ease an overactive thyroid gland, then it is only pure logic that too much of it can lead to an underactive gland.

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Tasmania's fluoride source and cost is uncertain

Hayden Johnson
@haydenjohnson94

TASWATER has refused to reveal where Tasmania’s fluoride is sourced from after the Kentish Council raised concerns about it being obtained from China.
In February the Kentish Council wrote to TasWater chief executive officer Mike Brewster and questioned the source of fluoride used in Lake Barrington.
Mr Brewster confirmed an Australian supplier contracted to provide the chemical sourced it “from multiple locations around the world”.

This revelation raised the ire of Kentish councillor Rodney Blenkhorn, who claimed Tasmania’s fluoride was being sourced from China and could contain impurities. “A lot of these fluoride chemicals contain heavy metals,” he said.“It’s a waste product and the talk is, it contains contaminants.”
He raised the concerns about fluoride with Health Minister Michael Ferguson but was unhappy with his response. Cr Blenkhorn recalled: “I asked the question, what do you know about fluoride and where is our fluoride sourced from?” “He never got back with the information about where our fluoride chemical is sourced from – he didn’t answer the question.”

The Advocate put a serious of questions to TasWater about the cost and source of fluoride in the state’s water but the organisation did not answer, claiming the contract details were a matter of commercial confidence. “Strict supply agreements are in place for both suppliers to ensure the quality of the ingredients and the continuity of supply,” a TasWater spokesman added.

Cr Blenkhorn said fluoride should be sourced from Tasmania and called on the state government to allow councils to make fluoride-related decisions. “I’d like to see it head down the path like in Queensland where the Premier at the time gave the powers back to local government regarding the addition of fluoride in their town’s water supplies,” he said.

“People have shown overwhelming opposition to fluoride in Tasmania’s water supply.”
A legislative change driven by the Queensland Liberal Government in 2012 saw more than 16 councils end fluoridation of their water. Mr Ferguson failed to respond directly to Cr Blenkhorn’s calls but instead reaffirmed that he would continue to support water fluoridation.
“A number of international and national organisations support the addition of fluoridation of drinking water,” Mr Ferguson said.

Fluoride Journal





Open source - Quarterly Journal of The International Society for Fluoride Research Inc.

Can too much fluoride create a health risk? Read more at http://www.star2.com/living/viewpoints/2016/09/25/fluoride-friend-or-foe/#HACFdZZvLCSbFHmz.99

A man drinking water on a hot summer day in Brussels, Belgium. Belgium, along with countries like Austria, China, Denmark, Japan and Hungary, do not add fluoride to their water supply.
Can too much fluoride create a health risk?
There have been huge changes in the field of dentistry over the past 30 years.
My generation (born in the 1970s) is probably the first where a high percentage of those aged 40 and over still have all of their own original teeth.
Most people in my parents’ generation had partial dentures or metal braces by the age of 40, while most of my grandparents’ generation had complete sets of dentures from as young as 30 years old.
These false teeth were commonly referred to as a “28 set dinner service”, and were traditionally given as a wedding gift to the bride and groom by their parents on their special day.
Such a wedding gift would certainly be considered bizarre today, thanks to the progress in dental care.
This means that we are really the first generation of people to have to consider the implications of long-term oral hygiene on our own original teeth.
Hopefully, you have been flossing and brushing every night, and visiting the dentist twice a year for scaling and polishing!
While most of the changes in dentistry have resulted in great improvements in overall dental health, there have also been challenges and controversies.
For example, the FDI World Dental Federation has for years, stood by two laws of practice:
• Fluoride is the best way to protect teeth from cavities, and
• Silver amalgam fillings containing mercury are the safest and most effective way to fill cavities.
Unfortunately, both fluoride and mercury have recently made medical journal The Lancet’s list of toxic substances that are harmful to human health.
While some dentists have changed their practices in the light of these developments, there are others who still hold firm to their belief in the safety and benefits of these two laws of practice.
What is fluoride?
Fluoride is a naturally-occurring substance that is found in drinking water.
Many observant dentists over the years noticed and documented the beneficial effects of fluoridated drinking water, and some even worked out the optimum levels in parts per million (ppm) for preventing cavities.
One such dentist was Dr H.T. Dean, whose 21 city study, published in 1942, showed that fluorosis was extremely rare at fluoride levels of 1ppm or below, which was also the optimum baseline for cavity prevention.
Based on this, the American town of Grand Rapids, Michigan, became the first in the world to have their drinking water artificially fluoridated on Jan 25, 1945.
In 1955, the British Department of Health followed by selecting three sites for pilot fluoridation schemes.
Their huge success in reducing cavities inspired other cities to follow by fluoridating their own water systems.
Currently, some 40 countries have artificial water fluoridation schemes in existence, including Malaysia.
This global initiative was proven to be so effective that in the early 1970s, fluoride was added to toothpaste. This move is thought to have been a major contributor to the fall in tooth decay rates experienced in developed countries in the past three decades.
The problems with fluoride
However, fluoride is cumulative and the body can’t remove or detoxify it.
This becomes a problem, especially for the brain and neurological development of young children.
It’s in the water we drink, the toothpaste we use daily and the processed foods we eat, meaning that so many of us are consuming dangerously higher levels than the recommended 1ppm by Dr Dean.
Added to these complications is the fact that artificially adding sodium fluoride to water has a vastly different effect on the body than drinking the naturally-occurring levels of calcium fluoride found in well water.
There is evidence to suggest that fluoride is:
• Carcinogenic
Dr Dean Burk, who was the United States National Cancer Institute chief of cytochemistry for over 30 years, received multiple research papers showing that fluoride increases the cancer death rate.
When comparing the 10 largest US cities with fluoridation and the 10 largest without, researchers found that following fluoridation, deaths from cancer went up immediately. The shift in numbers was dramatic, even within just a 12-month period.
• Neurotoxic
A February 2014 study in the journal Environmental Health stated: “A multivariate regression analysis showed that after socioeconomic status was controlled, each 1% increase in artificial fluoridation prevalence in 1992 was associated with approximately 67,000 to 131,000 additional ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) diagnoses from 2003 to 2011.”
• Disruptive to the endocrine system
The first report suggesting the negative effects of fluoride on the hormonal or endocrine system dates back over 160 years ago (Maumené, 1854).
Since then, there have been multiple research papers done on the impact of fluoride on the thyroid and pineal gland.
Calcification of the pineal gland is undoubtedly one of the most talked about and researched problems associated with fluoride.
Fluoride accumulates there more than in any other organ and leads to the formation of phosphate crystals that inhibit melatonin production.
Melatonin is a natural antioxidant, which also regulates our sleep patterns.
Hence, a calcified pineal gland leads to insomnia and other sleep-related disorders that greatly affect out mental and physical health.
Detoxifying fluoride
Here are a few tips on how to detoxify fluoride from your body:
• Reduce the fluoride entering your body
Stop consuming fluoridated public water.
Most filtering systems use simple carbon filtration methods that ineffectively filter fluoride from public/tap water.
Reverse osmosis and ionizer filters do remove more fluoride than common carbon filters, but not all of it.
It is best to stop brushing teeth with fluoridated toothpaste.
Even using the recommended pea-size amount is problematic as small amounts of sodium fluoride will end up getting into your bloodstream, even though you spit out the toothpaste.....................................

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Mike Adams - Hexavalent chromium (chromium-6) was just found in 75% of drinking water... the mass chemical suicide of America is under way

America's infrastructure collapsing into Third World status

As Donald Trump said recently at a rally in Michigan, we used to make cars in Flint and you couldn't drink the water in Mexico. Now the cars are being made in Mexico, and you can't drink the water in Flint. Nor can you safely drink public water almost anywhere in America, as it's almost universally contaminated with chromium-6, heavy metals or other toxic chemicals.

This doesn't even cover the deliberate poisoning of public water systems with fluoride, a neurotoxic chemical purchased in bulk from Chinese chemical plants (or sometimes acquired as a waste product from fertilizer manufacturing factories). Fluoride is dumped into public water supplies under the quack science claim that every person in the nation is deficient in fluoride -- a blatantly false and highly irresponsible claim. In reality, many children suffer from fluorosis, a dark mottling and discoloration of the teeth caused by too much exposure to toxic fluoride.

Avoid fluoride. A highly toxic metal, fluoride accumulates in certain areas of the brain (the pineal gland and hippocampus) and has been shown to significantly lower IQ and interfere with memory and complex brain functions. Studies have shown that even concentrations of 0.5 parts per million (ppm) can damage cells and microvessels in the brain. Yet, 60 percent of our public drinking water is fluorinated at higher levels of 1 to 1.3 ppm. - Dr. Blaylock's Prescriptions for Natural Health - 70 Remedies for Common Conditions by Russell L. Blaylock

What's astonishing in all this is just how quickly America's infrastructure is collapsing into "Third World" status under the rule of a corrupt political establishment. The education system has become nothing more than a propaganda indoctrination system; the food supply is inundated with unlabeled GMOs and toxic herbicides like glyphosate; and now the water is too toxic to drink almost everywhere.

California, a corrupt regime run by incompetent communists and "progressive" idiots, went right along with the toxic chemical industry to allow an astonishing 500 times higher levels of chromium-6 than what's known to be safe.



Chinese Suppliers Admit Fluoride is Poison

UK - Just four in ten children have seen an NHS dentist in last years

Child having teeth examined Professor Nigel Hunt, dean of the faculty of dental surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons, said: "There is nothing to smile about in these woeful statistics.

"With the average five-year-old now eating their own weight in sugar each year, it is alarming that 42.1 per cent of children failed to visit an NHS dentist at all in the last year.

"It is appalling that in the 21st century, tooth decay remains the most common reason why children aged five to nine are admitted to hospital. In some cases, these children undergo multiple tooth extractions under general anaesthetic - despite the fact that tooth decay is almost entirely preventable.

Izzi Seccombe, from the Local Government Association, said the figures were “deeply worrying”.

"Regular dentist trips can ensure tooth decay is tackled at an early stage, and avoid the need for far more invasive treatment in hospital later on,” she said.

The statistics reflect visits to NHS dentists. Experts pointed out that in some areas- such as Kensington and Chelsea – low numbers of visits to NHS dentists might be because families were more likely to pay for treatment.

Extractions were most common in South Tyneside and least common in Richmond upon Thames. The data also shows a 20 per cent rise in a year in fluoride varnish treatments for children. This is when a varnish is painted on to the teeth to strengthen the enamel, making it resistant to decay.

Henrik Overgaard-Nielsen, from the British Dental Association said: "When half of adults - and nearly five million children - fail to see the dentist, ministers have some very serious questions to answer.

"This isn't patient apathy, this is what you get when governments treat oral health as an optional extra. Effective prevention is impossible without regular check-ups, and to date ministers have been unwilling to get that message across."

Dr Sandra White, Director of Dental Public Health, Public Health England, said: “Tooth decay is a largely preventable disease that can lead to dental problems throughout life. For children, tooth decay can cause pain, problems with sleep, days off school and problems eating and socialising. Treatment can involve having teeth removed under general anaesthetic.

"Parents and carers can help reduce dental decay by reducing the amount of sugary foods and drinks in their children’s diet and offering just milk and water to drink. Parents should supervise young children and encourage older children to brush their teeth with fluoride toothpaste twice a day, especially before bed, and take them to the dentist regularly.”

Map of fluoridated New Zealand

MAPNZFLUORIDATED

USA - State still pushing fluoride

Two fluoridation-related observations:

First point: The Associated Press has just spotlighted drug makers’ efforts to promote use of opioid painkillers and blunt legislation aimed at preventing their overuse and abuse. Big Pharma’s efforts here mirror a much earlier promotion of fluoride-polluting industries and sugar producers for their own selfish purposes.

The AP series lays out how the drug industry has gained a measure of control over the science of painkillers, using its money to hire lobbyists and forge alliances with the medical sector to protect profits that come from the lucrative though deadly opioid trade.

A very similar strategy underlaid the promotion of fluoridation in the 1940s and beyond. Fluoridation was not so much a tooth decay preventative as a public relations ploy. The goal: protect fluoride-polluting industries from lawsuits and shield the sugar industry from being a target in tooth-decay prevention.

Second point: Recently, I sent the Vermont Department of Health laboratory water samples to compare my Rutland City tap water with water from my new, reverse osmosis filtration unit. I wanted to see if the filter was really working at removing fluoride.

The test report showed city water from my tap at 0.7 milligrams per liter, the level recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — misguided though that recommendation is. The test from my fluoride-filtering unit measured “less than” 0.3 milligrams per liter, the bottom level the state tests for. Therefore my filter is working.

Here’s the kicker: With my test report, the Health Department included a sheet with a “Dietary Fluoride Supplement Schedule” for those whose water has less than the “recommended” 0.7 milligrams per liter of fluoride.

And how does one supplement one’s fluoride intake? Well, with fluoride supplements, of course. And what about those supplements? It is notable that the Food and Drug Administration has never approved fluoride supplements, even though they require a prescription. Also, the FDA recently ordered Kirkman Industries to stop producing fluoride supplements on the grounds they are “drugs” that “are not generally recognized as safe and effective” for cavity prevention. Yes, really. The FDA said that.

As noted in today’s (Sept. 21) Herald, our state Department of Health is acting independently to curb the abuse of opioids in Vermont. But the same lead-the-way spirit is clearly lacking when it comes to the obsolete, unethical and risky practice of public water supply fluoridation and fluoride supplementation. Visit my website, rutlandfluorideaction.org, to see a critique of Health Commissioner Harry Chen’s previous false defense of fluoridation.

JACK CROWTHER

scientists link fluoridated water with adhd, obesity and depression

1. Bottle-fed infants receive the highest doses of fluoride as they rely solely on liquids for food, combined with their small size. A baby being fed formula receives approximately 175 times more fluoride than a breast-fed infant
2. There is not a single process in your body that requires fluoride
3. A multi-million dollar U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) -funded study found no relation between tooth decay and the amount of fluoride ingested by children
4. Water fluoridation cannot prevent the oral health crises that results from inadequate nutrition and lack of access to dental care
5. Water fluoridation is a violation of your individual right to informed consent to medication
6. Forty-one percent of all American children aged 12-15 are now impacted by dental fluorosis, rising to more than sixty percent of children in fluoridated communities
7. The chemicals used to fluoridate water supplies are largely hazardous by-products of the fertilizer industry and have never been required to undergo randomized clinical trials for safety or effectiveness by any regulatory agency in the world

Friday, September 23, 2016

NZ - 'Gun' aimed at district health board candidate in Timaru

South Canterbury District Health Board candidate Rachel Tomkinson claims she had a gun pointed at her as she campaigned ...A South Canterbury District Health Board candidate says she had a gun pointed at her as she campaigned on a busy Timaru street.Anti-fluoride campaigner Rachel Tomkinson claims the gun's firing mechanism was clicked, twice, before the man holding the gun was driven away.

Tomkinson said she told police she was on the footpath outside the Landings building on State Highway 1 when the incident occurred about 1.15pm on Wednesday.It was obvious she was campaigning: she was wearing a gold and purple lycra "superhero outfit" and holding an election placard, Tomkinson said on Friday.

A white utility vehicle drove slowly past her on the other side of the road, having just turned on to the highway from Sophia St, she said.She saw the ute's dark window roll down and a man, who was probably in his 20s, pointed something at her.It looked to be a BB gun or something similar. She said the man "clicked" the gun twice while it was pointed at her.Tomkins was by herself. She said she laughed off what happened and did not take it seriously until she told her friends.

They were shocked and urged her to report it to police. She said she did so on Thursday.She described the ute as being white with black trims and with tinted windows.Senior Sergeant Dylan Murray, of Timaru, on Friday confirmed a complaint had been laid and that inquiries were continuing.

Tomkinson, a health shop/cafe owner, has been a familiar sight in downtown Timaru for her part in the anti-fluoride group Sweet Freedom Army (SFA).The group's public campaigning started about four months ago and has continued with action on Stafford St and outside Timaru Hospital.

Tomkinson said the anti-fluoride campaign generated strong views from passers by, from robust comment to outright abuse.Early in the anti-fluoride campaign, a man told he she was hurting children and should be locked up, she said.She offered the man a hug; he was angry and continued to rant and rave, she said.
"It saddens me that people are getting so angry ... they don't have to agree with me."
The "rage" she encountered during the once-a-week action was sometimes shocking, she said.
"If they are bullying me what kind of example is that to their children or grandchildren?"

South Canterbury District Health Board chief executive Nigel Trainor could not comment directly on claims linked to a candidate's election campaign.However, he confirmed he had received no complaints as to how the public responded to the SFA campaign.

Mosaic sinkhole

MULBERRY — The politics heated up Thursday over state environmental officials’ response to the Mosaic sinkhole that emptied 215 million gallons of contaminated water into the Floridan Aquifer.
After Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton criticized the state’s initial silence about it, Republican Gov. Rick Scott fired back with orders for the Department of Environmental Protection to release its timeline of responsiveness and to provide daily updates.
In a separate flow of information, Mosaic posted on its website an illustration showing how it is using one if its existing 800-foot-deep wells to suck the contaminated water sideways out of the sinkhole into the well, then pumping the contaminated water up.
The well is pumping from the aquifer at a rate of 3,500 gallons a minute, Mosaic spokeswoman Callie Neslund said Thursday.
“We believe the contaminated water is sitting under the gypsum stack in the aquifer," she said. "And we believe it is being pumped over to the well and back up to be recycled.”
That belief is based on measurements of dissolved solids in the well water, basically finding salt in the water, she said. Among the contaminants that were in the pond sucked into the sinkhole were sodium (salt), small amounts of radium (radioactivity), sulfate and fluoride.
Early signs that a sinkhole was developing were noticed Aug. 27 by a Mosaic technician who reported the depth of the pond on top of the 150-foot tall gypsum stack had dropped by 2 feet. The 45-foot-wide sinkhole opened Sept. 5, emptying the pond. The depth of the sinkhole is still unknown but it is believed to extend down into the Floridan Aquifer .................................

USA - State still pushing fluoride

Two fluoridation-related observations:

First point: The Associated Press has just spotlighted drug makers’ efforts to promote use of opioid painkillers and blunt legislation aimed at preventing their overuse and abuse. Big Pharma’s efforts here mirror a much earlier promotion of fluoride-polluting industries and sugar producers for their own selfish purposes.

The AP series lays out how the drug industry has gained a measure of control over the science of painkillers, using its money to hire lobbyists and forge alliances with the medical sector to protect profits that come from the lucrative though deadly opioid trade. 

A very similar strategy underlaid the promotion of fluoridation in the 1940s and beyond. Fluoridation was not so much a tooth decay preventative as a public relations ploy. The goal: protect fluoride-polluting industries from lawsuits and shield the sugar industry from being a target in tooth-decay prevention.

Second point: Recently, I sent the Vermont Department of Health laboratory water samples to compare my Rutland City tap water with water from my new, reverse osmosis filtration unit. I wanted to see if the filter was really working at removing fluoride. 

The test report showed city water from my tap at 0.7 milligrams per liter, the level recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — misguided though that recommendation is. The test from my fluoride-filtering unit measured “less than” 0.3 milligrams per liter, the bottom level the state tests for. Therefore my filter is working.

Here’s the kicker: With my test report, the Health Department included a sheet with a “Dietary Fluoride Supplement Schedule” for those whose water has less than the “recommended” 0.7 milligrams per liter of fluoride. 

And how does one supplement one’s fluoride intake? Well, with fluoride supplements, of course. And what about those supplements? It is notable that the Food and Drug Administration has never approved fluoride supplements, even though they require a prescription. Also, the FDA recently ordered Kirkman Industries to stop producing fluoride supplements on the grounds they are “drugs” that “are not generally recognized as safe and effective” for cavity prevention. Yes, really. The FDA said that.

As noted in today’s (Sept. 21) Herald, our state Department of Health is acting independently to curb the abuse of opioids in Vermont. But the same lead-the-way spirit is clearly lacking when it comes to the obsolete, unethical and risky practice of public water supply fluoridation and fluoride supplementation. Visit my website, rutlandfluorideaction.org, to see a critique of Health Commissioner Harry Chen’s previous false defense of fluoridation.

JACK CROWTHER

It's in the water: the debate over fluoridation lives on

Many people take for granted the addition of fluoride into public drinking water systems that aims to prevent tooth decay. It’s a seven-decade old public health effort. But it’s not nearly as universally accepted as one might think.

At least seven cities or towns across the country debated it just this summer.

For example, Wellington, Fla., decided to add fluoride back into the water in July after the city council voted two years ago to remove it. Across the country in Healdsburg, Calif., voters will revisit a ballot question in November regarding whether to stop adding the mineral to the water supply.

“There has always been periodic discussion,” said Steven Levy, a dentistry professor at the University of Iowa. Levy is involved in an Iowa-based longitudinal study that tracks fluoride intake and its effects on children’s bones. “We are seeing more challenges now because of the communication explosion with the Internet.”

The debate started well before 1945 when Grand Rapids, Mich., became the first U.S. city to add fluoride to its water supply. In the decades since, opposition usually stems from studies linking fluoride intake by children with lower IQs, higher rates of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and potential toxicity.

Still, fluoridation has become a fairly common practice, with about 74% of the population receiving fluoridated water from community water systems, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the intervention, which is considered by the CDC to be one of the 10 top public health achievements of the 20th century and backed by the American Dental Association and the World Health Organization, also continues to raise grass-roots concerns. These arguments range from casting fluoride as unnecessary and ineffective to efforts to paint the mineral as “mass medication” and a “damaging environmental pollutant.”

“Fluoridation is not safe or cost-effective,” said Bill Osmunson, director of the Fluoride Action Network, a national organization against fluoridation of water supplies, adding that people should be given the freedom of choice so they can avoid ingesting excess fluoride.

In Wellington, Mayor Anne Gerwig often fields angry emails on this issue.

“I watch the videos that they email me, I read the information they send me,” Gerwig said. Gerwig has no background in science, but she read studies and fact-checked the claims being made by the town’s residents. Gerwig said she decided to support fluoridation after she found scientific consensus about the benefits of fluoridation in preventing tooth decay.

The CDC, for instance, considers water fluoridation to be the most cost-effective method of delivering fluoride to all, reducing tooth decay by 25% in children and adults. Tooth decay is still one of the most common chronic conditions among children.

“A big thing about community water fluoridation is that it’s a passive intervention, you don’t really have to do anything other than drink tap water,” said Katherine Weno, oral health director at the CDC. “You don’t have to buy a product or access to a dental professional. It benefits people who don’t have money to go to a dentist or don’t have any insurance.”

But some question the need for continued fluoridation, especially as products such as toothpaste and rinses containing fluoride are available, and because the chemical’s levels vary and indications of harm are not always clear.

Philippe Grandjean, an adjunct professor at Harvard University School of Public Health, has authored a couple of studies questioning the need for the added fluoride.

“Our dental health is clearly much less dependent on fluoride in drinking water than way back when this important public health intervention was initiated,” Grandjean said.

In a 2016 Harvard Public Health article, Grandjean commented about the need for more research about populations that may be vulnerable to the mineral and the proper dose of it in drinking water. In response, the article drew multiple critical letters.

“The article misrepresents the current state of the science of community water fluoridation, and does not provide a fair and balanced perspective,” wrote Francis Kim and Scott L. Tomar from the American Association of Public Health Dentistry and Bruce Donoff, dean of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine in one of the letters.

New studies are published almost every year that bring up concerns about fluoridation in drinking water, linking the intake with various developmentalissues and even thyroid problems, issues that Osmunson also brought up. Weno and Levy said those studies were performed in places where natural fluoride levels are higher and where residents may get fluoride through milk or salt rather than water. Excessive fluoride intake does have health implications -- a problem commonly found in places with high concentrations of natural fluoride such as China, India and Africa. Most Americans receive water with low natural levels of fluoride.

Health officials also monitor and review what is appropriate. The Department of Health and Human Services in April 2015 released new recommendations for fluoride levels in drinking water, updating and replacing the level in place since 1962 in order to reflect the fact that Americans now have more sources of fluoride in toothpaste, mouthwashes and other products.

But other towns continue to wrestle with the issue. In July, the commissioners of Soddy-Daisy, Tenn., voted to stop adding fluoride and Houston’s city council chose to leave it in. In August, Port Angeles, Wash., stopped fluoridation until voters decide in November 2017.

And for some of the local officials involved in these debates, their take on the issue is part of even greater political questions.

“The individuals who benefit the most are poor children,” said Dick White, mayor pro tem of Durango, Colo. The town decided in June to continue adding fluoride to its water. “If we get national health care for every single person, we could probably eliminate fluoridation in the water because we can ensure that every child is getting dental care.”

Kaiser Health News is a national health policy news service that is part of the nonpartisan Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Thursday, September 22, 2016



Worth seeing again.

How Fluoride in Your Water May Cause Diabetes

Glass Pitcher of WaterThe United States is one of only a few countries to add fluoride to its water, which may be contributing to rising diabetes rates.
Recent studies have unveiled the many health risks of water fluoridation, including lower IQs among children exposed to water with high levels of fluoride. That finding came from a 2012 meta-analysis conducted by Harvard researchers, while a 2014 study published in Lancet Neurology classified fluoride as a neurotoxin.
Now, a new study published in the Journal of Water and Health makes the fluoride-diabetes connection.

Fluoride May Increase Diabetes Risk

Diabetes rates have increased nearly 4-fold in the last 30 years, and show no signs of slowing. An estimated 25% of the 29 million Americans with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Water fluoridation may be contributing to the problem.
Kyle Fluegge, Ph.D., a health economist for New York City’s health department, tested the theory as a post-doctoral fellow at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Fluegge used mathematical models to examine the possible connection between fluoride concentrations in water and rising diabetes rates in 22 states from 2005 to 2010. An analysis showed a direct increase between water fluoridation and diabetes, with a 1-milligram increase in fluoride correlating with a 0.17% increased risk for diabetes. This increased risk was determined after other factors, such as diet and physical inactivity, were accounted for.
Interestingly, different types of fluoride exhibited different outcomes on diabetes risk. For instance, sodium fluoride and sodium fluorosilicate both appeared to increase diabetes risk. Sodium fluoride was the first type of fluoride to be used in water fluoridation efforts, and the one most studied in toxicology research; however, its use has been dramatically scaled back. Naturally occurring fluoride and fluorosilicic acid, on the other hand actually appeared to lower diabetes risk. These two types of fluoride, however, have each been shown to be susceptible to arsenic contamination, another concern of toxic proportions when it comes to drinking tap water.

How to Reduce Your Fluoride Exposure

There are proactive steps you can take to reduce your exposure to fluoride in your drinking water. The following suggestions are taken from the Fluoride Action Network’s Top 10 Ways to Reduce Fluoride Exposure.
  1. Stop Drinking Tap Water: Invest in a water filter (which will save you money down the line). Not all water filters can eliminate fluoride. Make sure yours utilizes reverse osmosis, deionizers, or activated alumina.
  2. Spring water is also a viable alternative to tap water. Plastic bottles can carry their own health risks, so consider a monthly delivery service that uses glass containers. The Fluoride Action Network recommends making sure your spring water contains less than 0.2 ppm of fluoride.
  3. Use a non-fluoride toothpaste and avoid fluoride gel treatments at the dentist.
For more suggestions on ways to cut back on fluoride and its associated health risks visit theFluoride Action Network.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

NZ - Top dentist cautioned over fluoride facts

Anti-flouride campaigners have complained about a leading dentist's comments on television. Photo / fileA group claiming a dentist misled the public and disrespected other health professionals over fluoridation has publicly released a letter from the Dental Council saying the dentist has been "cautioned".

Anti-fluoride lobby group Fluoride Free NZ published the letter from the council's legal adviser, which said Dr Rob Beaglehole was cautioned over comments made on TV show Paul Henry earlier this year. On the show, which aired in April, Beaglehole - who is a spokesman for the New Zealand Dental Association and chief dental officer at the Nelson District Health Board - said all health authorities around the world urgently recommended water fluoridation.

"There's not one reputable health organisation anywhere on the globe that will say water fluoridation causes problems that some of the anti-fluoridationists are highlighting," Beaglehole said on the show.

Fluoride Free NZ complained to the council, and Beaglehole responded that it was imprecise to use the word "all" when referring to health authorities around the world. The Dental Council "accepted that the comments were made in good faith in a challenging interview situation and that there was no deliberate attempt to mislead the public".

In the letter from the council, addressed to Hawke's Bay naturopath and anti-fluoride campaigner Kevin Tinker, the council said Beaglehole "rigorously rejected" the suggestion he lied or violated professional standards. The council recommended Beaglehole seek media training and said he was cautioned about expressing his views in public on the subject of community water fluoridation.

The campaigners have called the council's response "woefully inadequate". Anti-fluoride spokeswoman Mary Byrne said Beaglehole's comments were misleading because there was "virtually no water fluoridation in the whole of Europe".
In 2014, a panel commissioned by the Prime Minister's Chief Science Adviser Sir Peter Gluckman and the Royal Society of New Zealand president Sir David Skegg found there were "no adverse effects" of fluoridation of public water supplies.
A Dental Council spokeswoman said the letter was not publicly released, as stated by Fluoride Free New Zealand.

Beaglehole is overseas and unavailable to comment.

The NZ Dental Association said: "Dr Beaglehole is a leading advocate and spokesperson for sensible, safe, proven and effective actions leading to the improvement of dental health of our communities; community water fluoridation and reduction of sugar consumption being very high on his and the Association's list of effective measures to reduce tooth decay."Dr Beaglehole is currently in Geneva for three months working with the World Health Organisation on issues regarding the reduction of sugar consumption."
- NZ Herald
By Susan Strongman

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

WDDTY - Sugar industry paid researchers to say fats caused heart disease

For nearly 50 years, saturated fats were seen as the main culprits in causing heart disease, and a discovery of some old research papers has discovered why: the sugar industry had been paying scientists to say so.

Sugar was suspected as a cause of heart disease in the 1960s, but the Sugar Association threw everyone off the scent by paying the equivalent of $50,000 to three Harvard scientists for a review that minimized the link between sugar and heart disease and instead suspected saturated fats.

Has the Flint, Michigan, water crisis hit a nerve in the fluoride debate?


flint water crisisWhen the water source of a small community in Michigan was switched from Lake Huron to the Flint River due to financial issues, the devastating long-term effects of this decision took the nation by storm. During the nearly two years that the city of Flint was using the toxic water source, its citizens cried out for help. But by the time the city reacted, the damage was irreversible in many ways. According to an article from NPR on April 20, 2016, a resident of Flint had her water tested for lead at 104,000 parts per billion in 2015. The Environmental Protection Agency’s limit for drinking water is 15,000 parts per billion.
Much of the nation was enraged at the crisis in Flint, Michigan. After seeing the devastating effects of lead poisoning appear in countless news articles, headlines and social media posts, the nation became rightfully afraid of this happening to their own communities and loved ones. According to Lead Action News, there are 63 unique listed health effects and symptoms from lead poisoning in children and perinatal development and 76 in adults, including cognitive function deficits, miscarriages, sterility and mental health issues. Lead poisoning also affects dentition and oral health.  Lead Action News states that exposure to lead can cause “teeth with blue-black lines near the gum base,” which oral health providers can relate to gum recession and possible periodontal disease.
Historically, the dental community has tried to combat oral health diseases not only by educating the public on key issues, but by adding fluoride into drinking water. Fluoride acts by slowing the breakdown of enamel and helping assist in the remineralization process of our dentition. According to the CDC in 2014, roughly 74 percent of the U.S. population served by the community water system received fluoridated water. Some states, however, like Hawaii and Idaho, drop well below this line at 12 and 31 percent respectively. The necessity of fluoride in water is not a recent debate, but the Flint, Michigan, water crisis seemed to elevate it to a new high.
There are many groups that disagree with the addition of fluoride to water. Fluoride Action Network, a group against the fluoridation of community water sources, has claimed that the mineral actually leaches lead from pipes and uses the crisis in Flint as a warning, calling it the “tip of the iceberg.” However, an article from the CDC website in 2013 mutes this point by stating that the fluoride we use in drinking water has a low water solubility, and is added to corrosion inhibitors, increasing the safety of fluoridated water. Although the Flint water crisis sparked questions from the American public regarding the safety of fluoride in water, the ADA still stands firm in the fact that more than 70 years of scientific research has demonstrated a 25 percent decrease in decay of dentition for children and adults while using fluoridated water. Fluoridated water is, according to the CDC, one of the 10 greatest health advancements in the 20th Century, and will continue to have the support of the oral health community nationwide.
~ Jessica Anderson, Georgia ’20

NZ - Lone Waikato DHB board member says no to fluoride

The Waikato District Health Board supports fluoride in the region's tap water supply.A health board member has broken ranks to accuse his colleagues of pushing through what he calls a "rubber-stamp" statement supporting water fluoridation.

Andrew Buckley unsuccessfully opposed the re-adoption of the Waikato District Health Board's position statement on fluoridation, dubbing it "flawed decision-making", but chairman Bob Simcock said the board was simply following the science and Buckley was a lone voice.

Local councils, not the health board, decide whether or not to put fluoride in the water. But many, including Hamilton City Council, have been the subject of campaigns to remove it and have looked to the DHB for a stance on it when making their decision.....................

No Evidence for Fluoridated Water to Result in Less Cavities

By Dr. Mercola
Two-thirds of Americans drink tap water that has added fluoride. Unlike other chemicals added to water, which are intended to treat the water itself, fluoride is intended to treat the people who drink the water, whether they want the treatment or not.
As the Fluoride Action Network (FAN) puts it, “Fluoridating water supplies can thus fairly be described as a form of mass medication, which is why most European countries have rejected the practice.”1
In the U.S., many people assume the fluoride in drinking water is beneficial for their teeth, an assumption that has been widely spread by public health agencies.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has partnered with the American Dental Association (ADA) in saying fluoridation is “nature’s way to prevent tooth decay”2 — a statement that is both misleading and inaccurate.

The Fluoride in Drinking Water Is Not Natural

The CDC and ADA state that “some communities are lucky enough to have naturally occurring optimal levels of fluoride in their water supplies.”3
While it’s true that fluoride is naturally occurring in some areas, leading to high levels in certain water supplies “naturally,” naturally occurring substances are not automatically safe (think of arsenic, for instance).
When people are exposed to high levels of naturally occurring fluoride, severe disease can result. Data from India’s Union Health and Family Welfare Ministry indicate that nearly 49 million people are living in areas where fluoride levels in water are above the permissible levels.
The World Health Organization recommends fluoride levels in drinking water stay between 0.8 and 1.2 milligrams (mg) per liter and do not exceed 1.5 mg per liter.
Exposure to levels above this amount may cause pitting of tooth enamel and fluoride deposits in your bones, while exposure to levels above 10 mg per liter may cause crippling skeletal fluorosis, as well as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, seizures and muscle spasms.
Further, the fluoride added to drinking water is not the naturally occurring variety or even pharmaceutical grade; it’s a byproduct of the phosphate fertilizer industry. FAN explained:4
“The main chemicals used to fluoridate drinking water are known as ‘silicofluorides’ (i.e., hydrofluorosilicic acid and sodium fluorosilicate). Silicofluorides are not pharmaceutical-grade fluoride products; they are unprocessed industrial by-products of the phosphate fertilizer industry.
Since these silicofluorides undergo no purification procedures, they can contain elevated levels of arsenic — more so than any other water treatment chemical.
In addition, recent research suggests that the addition of silicofluorides to water is a risk factor for elevated lead exposure, particularly among residents who live in homes with old pipes.”

Evidence Is Lacking That Fluoridated Water Reduces Cavities

The ADA also claims that water fluoridation reduces decay in children’s teeth by anywhere from 18 percent to 60 percent. This, too, is highly questionable however.....................