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UK Against Fluoridation

Saturday, April 20, 2019

The Truth About Fluoride with Melissa Gallico

The Truth About Fluoride with Melissa Gallico
The Dr. Hedberg Show
Alternative Health

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 37:15 — 34.5MB) | Embed
In this episode of The Dr. Hedberg Show, I interview Melissa Gallico about fluoride.  We talked about where fluoride comes from, why it was added to our water supply, how to know if your water is fluoridated, how to filter fluoride, other sources of fluoride, the fluoride-acne connection, the fluoride-thyroid connection, how to detoxify fluoride with iodine, and how to petition your local legislators to remove fluoride from your water supply.  I was not aware of the fluoride-acne connection so this was an enlightening podcast that everyone should listen to who has acne or a thyroid issue.

Dr. Hedberg: Well, welcome everyone to the "Dr. Hedberg Show." This is Dr. Hedberg, and really looking forward to the interview today. I'm talking to Melissa Gallico. And Melissa is the author of the book "The Hidden Cause of Acne: How Toxic Water Is Affecting Your Health and What You Can Do About It," and also a book called "F is For Fluoride: A Feasible Fairy Tale for Free Thinkers 15 and Up." She's a former military intelligence officer, Fulbright Scholar and intelligence specialist at the Federal Bureau of Investigation where she instructed classes for FBI analysts at Quantico, and provided analytics support for National Security Investigations. She graduated with honors from Georgetown University, and she has a master's degree from the University of St Andrews in Scotland. So, Melissa, welcome to the show.Melissa: Thank you so much for having me.

Dr. Hedberg: Yeah. So I heard you on the...first I heard you on the "15-minute Matrix" podcast, and was really interested in what you were talking about. I've studied fluoride a little bit over the years, but just mainly related to how it affects the thyroid. But why don't we just start out with some basics regarding fluoride and fluoridated water? So can you talk about why fluoride was added to the water? Why did they do that, how did it happen, and how can people tell if they have fluoridated water?

Melissa: Sure. So in the mid-20th century, dentists started...well, originally, they noticed that fluoride caused brown stains on teeth, and it's a condition called dental fluorosis. So that's where they started studying fluoride and its effect on tooth enamel. And eventually, they started developing a theory that, you know, too much fluoride is bad for your tooth enamel, it causes this cosmetic staining, but maybe a little bit of fluoride is actually good for your tooth enamel and makes it stronger and prevents cavities.
So that's the theory behind why they add it to the water supply today. They've been doing it for over 70 years. And they just think of it as adjusting the fluoride level to, like, this optimal dose that helps prevent cavities. And that's what I always assumed it was, I always drank fluoridated water, and I used fluoride in my toothpaste, and I had the treatments at the dentist. I never really thought about it. But when I got older and I realized that fluoride was affecting my health in negative ways, I looked into it more. And I looked into the history and realized that behind that very nice story that I believed and that I, you know, told myself and just assumed was true, there's actually a very deep pollution scandal there.

And people are always surprised when I talk about pollution and fluoride, because we've forgotten that fluoride was the leading form of air pollution at the time the science was being developed in the mid-20th century. It's a common element in the earth's crust. So when we started these large-scale mining operations for things like aluminum or phosphate, these companies were emitting just toxic amounts of fluoride into the atmosphere, and it was causing a lot of lawsuits. So the fluoride would go into the atmosphere, it would end up on the grass, poisoning cattle,

Friday, April 19, 2019

Winsor Star - Reader letter: Some people are more affected by fluoride

Re: The fluoride debate: ‘I know what I saw,’ by Anne Jarvis, March 1.
As an environmentalist, organic farmer and believer of informed consent, I have several reasons for opposing fluoridation chemicals in drinking water but after reading Anne Jarvis’ opinion piece about dental anecdotes I thought it important that the public know the reality for people like me, who suffer kidney disease.
I have polycystic kidney disease. This is an inherited disease that results in compromised kidney function. Fluoride is a toxin and drinking water with added fluoride puts a strain on my kidneys. When kidney disease patients swallow fluoride, it accumulates in our bodies more so than someone with kidneys that work properly. Ingesting fluoride means it will build up in my bones and make them more brittle as I age, increasing my risk for hip fractures and more.
Fluoride is easy to find and cheap to buy in toothpaste for those who want it. It doesn’t make sense to add something to the drinking water so that it becomes unsafe for some members of the community.
Bottled water is not affordable and not environmentally friendly. I already pay for municipal drinking water from my tap — though I and others needing to avoid fluoride should not be burdened with finding and paying for an alternative source of drinking water.
One in 10 people suffer kidney disease, according to the Kidney Foundation of Canada. Kidney disease sufferers are encouraged to drink large amounts of water.
It is ironic, this public health policy of fluoridating a water supply to target a group of people that can’t afford dental health care, while ignoring another group of people who will be harmed. This segment of society deserves the same equitable access to safe drinking water as everyone else, without the harm to their kidneys and overall health. Water is needed for life, fluoride is not.
Lesley Labbe, Ruthven

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

My Old Letter to the Editor on Water Fluoridation: Is Tooth Decay More Important than Brain Decay?

Melissa Dykes
Melissa Dykes Apr 15, 2019
I was looking over some of the oldest content I put up back when I first started Truthstream Media as a blog in 2011, and I came across this letter to the editor I wrote to my local newspaper on the dangers of fluoridating water. This is one of the first topics I became passionate about after I began researching it; hence, one of the first videos I ever made had to do with fluoridation and I’ve made many others over the years. (The one below is my favorite.)

In the years since, I have traveled to Canada and Europe for the first time while filming our documentaries, and I realized that in many other countries around the world, many other governments do not mass “medicate” their citizens like this. Despite what the American Dental Association claims, studies have actually shown that the number of cavities do not go up in communities that end water fluoridation; in fact, in Germany as just one example, researchers found significantly less dental caries after water fluoridation was stopped.
It kind of amazes me that here we are in 2019, and cities across America are still dumping a dangerous byproduct of the fertilizer industry into our municipal water supplies, under the outdated and debunked premise that it’s somehow “good for our teeth” (while also magically managing not to harm the rest of our organs and soft tissues it comes into contact with or our bones where it accumulates over time, potentially causing skeletal fluorosis).
As the short letter below never quite made it over to the new site when Aaron and I relaunched Truthstream Media together back in April 2013 (six years ago today, I just noticed), I thought I’d go ahead and post the original here… for posterity.

* * * * * * *

Note: The newspaper has a limit of 400 words or less, or this would have been longer. Feel free to use all or part of this letter in your own city! We need to get poisonous chemicals out of our water supply!! ~Mel
Fluoridation: Is tooth decay more important than brain decay?
Our city needs to reconsider the thousands of dollars we taxpayers spend on water fluoridation. Ever wonder why the United States consistently shows a drop in educational test scores versus the rest of the world? A recent study conducted by Harvard University researchers published in a federal government journal concluded, “Our results support the possibility of adverse effects of fluoride exposures on Children’s neurodevelopment.” Did you know fluoride is listed on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) database of developmental neurotoxicants as a “chemical with substantial evidence for developmental neurotoxicity”? This may be why New Hampshire recently passed a statewide fluoride warning law.
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “grandfathered” fluoride in before the 1938 drug testing requirement, so fluoride has never even been officially FDA-approved for ingestion in all these years, nor is it on the FDA’s “approved drug” list. Fluoride is a chemical byproduct. Three types are used for fluoridation, one of which is a liquid by-product of phosphate fertilizer manufacturing. Because fluoride medication of our water is done outright, everyone ingests differing amounts depending on size and how much water they drink. The skin, being the body’s largest organ, also takes in fluoride every time we bathe or shower. Fluoride accumulates in our systems, and studies have shown adverse effects on nearly every organ in the body, from reducing thyroid activity to impairing kidney function. According to the National Toxicology Program, a “preponderance of evidence” from lab studies also indicates that fluoride is a “mutagenic compound”. Many mutagenic substances have been known to cause cancer. It makes sense Harvard researchers found fluoride negatively impacted the smaller, developing brains of children even worse than adults.
When we take a drink of water, how much surface time does that mouthful have with our teeth before we swallow it anyway? We ingest fluoride and it travels to every other system in our body, accumulating there. While cavities can certainly be an issue, impaired organs and bodily system function that lowers our overall life expectancy seems a tad direr in the grand scheme of things. Is dental health more important than organ health? While people have cheap, easy access to fluoridated toothpaste and toothbrushes, there is no quick drugstore remedy that can fix potentially permanent organ damage and a forever lowered IQ that studies have shown water fluoridation can cause.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Monday, April 15, 2019

NHS Pilot planned to help Devon's most deprived kids learn how to brush their teeth

The scheme would be targeted at children in the 50 per cent most deprived areas in Devon and would be for children who attend nursery and reception class.
Children in nursery and reception classes across Devon’s most deprived areas may soon be taught how to brush their teeth.
NHS England South are currently looking seeking interest from providers who want to run a supervised tooth brushing service in the county.
The scheme would be targeted at children in the 50 per cent most deprived areas in Devon and would be for children who attend nursery and reception class.
Previous pilots ran across the UK have revealed that children who took part are less reluctant to brush their teeth at home and the number of parents either attending or planning to attend a dentist with their child has increased, with 72 per cent saying it was easy to incorporate brushing into a daily routine.........................

Sunday, April 14, 2019

Canada - Windsor Star

Fluoride in water is unsafe for some

Re: The fluoride debate: ‘I know what I saw,’ by Anne Jarvis, March 1.
As an environmentalist, organic farmer and believer of informed consent, I have several reasons for opposing fluoridation chemicals in drinking water, but after reading Anne Jarvis’s opinion piece about dental anecdotes I thought it important that the public know the reality for people like me who suffer kidney disease.
I have polycystic kidney disease. This is an inherited disease that results in compromised kidney function. Fluoride is a toxin, and drinking water with added fluoride puts a strain on my kidneys. When kidney disease patients swallow fluoride, it accumulates in our bodies more so than someone with kidneys that work properly. Ingesting fluoride means it will build up in my bones and make them more brittle as I age, increasing my risk for hip fractures and more. Fluoride is easy to find and cheap to buy in toothpaste for those who want it. It doesn’t make sense to add something to the drinking water so that it becomes unsafe for some members of the community. Bottled water is not affordable and not environmentally friendly. I already pay for municipal drinking water from my tap. I and others needing to avoid fluoride should not be burdened with finding and paying for an alternative source of drinking water.

One in 10 people suffer kidney disease, according to the Kidney Foundation of Canada. Kidney disease sufferers are encouraged to drink large amounts of water. It is ironic, this public health policy of fluoridating a water supply to target a group of people that can’t afford dental health care, while ignoring another group of people who will be harmed. This segment of society deserves the same equitable access to safe drinking water as everyone else, without the harm to their kidneys and overall health. Water is needed for life, fluoride is not.
Lesley Labbe, Ruthven

Saturday, April 13, 2019

The Ask Dr. D'Adamo internet advice column ran from 1996 to 2009

Flouride In Toothpaste




QUESTION: Is it true that fluoride in the toothpaste should be avoided for all types of blood type?



ANSWER: We live in an increasingly 'fluoridated' world. The fluoride in water and toothpaste is potentially harmful; the hydrogen fluoride in contaminated air far more so. Each year, tens of thousands of tons of hydrogen fluoride create an environmental hazard which can be 1,000 times more harmful than sulphur dioxide, a key, but rarely mentioned component of 'acid rain'.

Fluoride in toothpaste can be absorbed through the tissues of the mouth, as well as swallowed accidentally. Many prescription drugs also contain fluoride. None of these items are labeled to indicate the quantity of fluoride added to the daily dietary total. In essence, flouride can become a 'straw that breaks the camel's back.'

In the early days of water flouridation, the total intake for most adults was 0.02 mg/kg/day: About one to one and a half milligrams of fluoride daily. Today, the figure is 0.095 mg/kg/day, and from food and drinking water alone, more than 6 milligrams daily.

Thus, the amount of flouride we are getting simply through the environment, has long ago passed the amount necessary to protect bones and teeth.

Friday, April 12, 2019

Rising demand of fluorosilicic acid in fluoridation of drinking water is expected to drive the market 2019

Fluorosilicic acid is an organic liquid produced as by product of hydrogen fluoride and phosphoric acid production. It is generally used for fluoridation of water to maintain fluoride level in water by municipal corporations and in toothpastes. Maintaining fluoride levels helps in preventing tooth decay. Being a liquid, fluorosilicic acid is easy to handle and plant operators does not have to handle the fine powder which may create occupational hazards. Fluorosilicic acid is used in various applications that include sterilization, electroplating, commercial laundry, oil well acidizing, wood preservative, stain and rust removing, neutralizing agent and for tanning of glass, ceramic and animal hides.
Rising demand of fluorosilicic acid in fluoridation of drinking water is expected to drive the market. Governmental regulations in the U.S. and Europe are compelling the municipal corporations to use fluorosilicic acid as fluoridating agent for public drinking water. Fluorosilicic acid is used in manufacturing of commercial detergents such as cryolite, silicon tetrafluoride and other fluorosilicicates. Rising demand from textile industry is further expected to boost the market growth as it is being used for removal of stain and rust from the fabrics. Concentrated fluorosilicic acid found applications in tanning of animal hides & skin, glass and ceramics. Rising demand for tanned glass and ceramic from various end user applications such as house interiors, electrical and electronics is expected to fuel the flurosilicic acid market.
Read Report Overview @
However, corrosive nature and fuming property of concentrated fluorosilicic acid especially above 20% concentration may hamper the market growth. The acidic nature of this compound leaches the lead and arsenic from water delivery plumbing. Additionally, it is a byproduct of phosphate fertilizer industry and claimed to be contaminated with heavy metals and radioactive elements which may inhibit the fluorosilicic acid market growth. Increasing application in sterilization and fumigation technologies is expected to provide immense opportunities for the players in fluorosilicic acid market. Further, rising demand from dental applications such as mouth rinse solutions, chewing gums and toothpastes is expected to contribute to the opportunities in developed countries.
North America is the largest consumer of fluorosilicic acid in terms of consumption followed by Europe. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from the U.S. has certified the chemical to be used as fluoridating agent in drinking water and have compelled municipal corporations to use for fluoridation to prevent tooth decay of population. Commercial laundry and textile industries are expected to boost the fluorosilicic acid market in this region. European countries such as Ireland, the United Kingdom uses fluorosilicic acid for fluoridation of drinking water and for tanning animal hides and skin. Rising demand from these end user industries is expected to fuel the market growth in this region. Growing application in mouth wash, gel and other dental products is expected to drive the market in North America and Europe. China was the largest producer of fluorosilicic acid due to presence of large number of players and abundant raw materials. Changing lifestyle and disposable income in Asia Pacific is driving dental care and commercial laundry market which in turn expected to boost the fluorosilicic acid market.

Tooth decay common for kids in Northland and Auckland - study

Click title to see video
A study has found two-fifths of pre-schoolers in Northland and Auckland have dental cavities.
Dental exams of five-year-olds from 2014 and 2015 show about 40 percent had one or more decayed, missing or filled teeth.
The prevalence was higher in Maori and Pacific children - around three-fifths - and those from the most-deprived neighbourhoods or communities where the water isn't fluoridated.
Children who had been hospitalised for injury also had a higher rate of tooth decay.
"More effort is necessary to reduce the burden of early childhood caries in Auckland and Northland," the researchers said.
"Healthy public policies, such as community water fluoridation, and strategies to reduce sugary drink consumption, such as the implementation of a sugar-sweetened beverage tax, regulating the promotion of sugary foods and drinks, and health warnings on product labels similar to tobacco products, are necessary to address oral health problems in New Zealand children.
"Innovative health promotion, such as health messaging through culturally relevant and interactive platforms of videos, songs, television and tooth brushing demonstration, may also be considered.'
Children are eligible for free dental care up until the age of 17.
The latest study was carried out by the University of Auckland and Waitemata District Health Board, and published in the New Zealand Medical Journal on Friday.
Newshub.



How many parents know they should only put a smear of toothpaste on the toothbrush? The companies won't like that advice either as sales will go down.

Thursday, April 11, 2019

UK - Letters: 'Plan to add fluoride to Darlington water defies common sense'

THE plan to fluoridate Darlington’s water supply defies common sense.
If the goal is, as stated by the council, to improve the dental health of our children, why is there a need to force all age groups to consume fluoride?
Far from specifically targeting children at risk of tooth decay, water fluoridation is highly inefficient as it compulsorily medicates the entire population.
There is also no control over the doses consumed. People who live active lifestyles, such as those who take exercise or play sports, inevitably drink more water than those who don’t.
Those who prepare meals at home, rather than relying on convenience foods bought from the supermarket, also consume more.
Fluoridation means every time we turn on our taps, be it to drink water, heat it for tea or coffee, cook with it or wash our food with it, we would be exposing ourselves to the chemical.
Beer drinkers who enjoy real ales produced by the area’s fine local breweries would also be affected.
Locally brewed beer would no longer be as real as it once was, but would instead contain synthetic chemical fluoride.
Fluoridation could well result in the town’s discerning real ale drinkers eschewing beers produced by local brewers in favour of those from outside the area produced with natural non-fluoridated water.
The real cause of tooth decay in children isn’t a lack of fluoride in our water, but poor diet.
Fluoridation avoids focusing on the chief causes of poor diets in children, such as low wages and poverty.
Instead, it naively pretends that compulsory mass medication of the entire population can solve the problem.
The people of Darlington, and our children, deserve better than this.
Paul Anthony Taylor, Darlington

1 Comment
pensioner25 hrs ago
 0Who is trying to sneak this through?? Northumbria water or Darlington Council?? and why have they not let people know their plans? this is the first I have heard of it- it needs to be known before people re-elect these people so we can stop them getting back into power and poisoning us all!!! Try giving the kids less sweets and sugary drinks rather than poison people with a dangerous chemical in the life giving water- COMPULSORY ADMINISTRATION OF A CHEMICAL WITHOUT PEOOPLE HAVING THE OPTION NOT TO BE POISONED BY THE COUNCIL! OR NW! NO THANKS I DO NOT WISH TO HAVE MY DRINKING WATER TREATED IN THIS WAY, IF YOU GO AHEAD THE COUNCIL WILL NEED TO BUY AND FIT A WATER PURIFIER TO MY PIPES AT THEIR COST, OR FACE MY SOLICITOR!

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

USA - Tim Ryan’s Long, Weird History of Palling Around With Fluoride and Vaccine Skeptics

Tim Ryan’s Long, Weird History of Palling Around With Fluoride and Vaccine Skeptics

Why the 2020 candidate’s quest to win the “yoga vote” might come back to haunt him.









Tim Ryan
At a 2018 question-and-answer session at a summit for wellness influencers in San Diego, an attendee wanted to talk to Tim Ryan about fluoride.

Ryan, a Democratic congressman from Northeast Ohio, had co-sponsored a resolution in 2015 hailing water fluoridation as a public health triumph. But the woman told Ryan that water fluoridation had given her severe acne. And as she recounted her subsequent investigation into its effects, Ryan’s position appeared to soften.

“Well you’ve already got me to reconsider,” Ryan told her. “I want to get you with my staff.”

“That’s government in action right there, folks,” he continued after the audience applauded. “We’ll get on it. And the stories—that’s how you move people, with stories.”

At that point, the moderator of the town hall, Mark Hyman—an Ohio physician who wrote the preface to Ryan’s second book—chimed in. “And it’s not just acne,” he said. “There’s many, many issues with fluoride.”

“Yeah,” Ryan said.


Associate as friends or chums, as in Bill and Jim have been palling around for years . This expression makes a verb of the noun pal , which comes from the Gypsy word for “brother.” 
Never heard of the word before

Tuesday, April 09, 2019



Don't remember seeing this video before, shame it never changed anything in Ireland.

Flavor augmentations affect fluoride bioavailability from brewed dark tea

Highlights

The bioavailability of fluoride in dark tea and NaF aqueous solution was evaluated.
Milk significantly reduced the bioavailability of fluoride in dark tea.
In rats, butter prolonged the absorption period of fluoride from dark tea.

Abstract

Fluorosis caused by consumption of dark tea is a major public health problem in the western part of China. In this study, the effects of milk powder, butter, and table salt on the bioavailability of the fluoride in an infusion of dark tea were investigated in a rat model. These substances were examined for their potential as dietary interventions to reduce the risk of tea-induced fluorosis. Fluoride was less bioavailable from the dark tea infusion than from a NaF solution. The addition of milk powder significantly decreased the amount of fluoride absorbed from the dark tea infusion and increased the amount of fluoride in fecal excretion. While butter had a limited effect on fluoride bioavailability, it prolonged the fluoride absorption period. The addition of 4 mg/mL table salt significantly increased the bioavailability of fluoride in the dark tea infusion. The addition of different flavor augmentations to a dark tea infusion had different effects on fluoride bioavailability. Therefore, dietary intervention may be a novel strategy for reducing fluorosis risk.

Monday, April 08, 2019

Sunday, April 07, 2019

Why You Simply MUST Filter Your Water

Frank Lipman, M.D.
Water is a life-sustaining fluid that’s essential to health, but if you're drinking straight out of the tap, it can undermine your health. When you drink tap (or even spring) water, you’ll likely be getting more than you bargained for — chlorine, fluorine compounds, Trihalomethanes (THMs), assorted hormones, pesticides and even trace amounts of prescription drugs. It can be a witches’ brew of health-killing effluvia, but you can improve the odds.

Here’s the low-down on water, and how to turn it back into the health drink nature intended:

Tap water is dirtier than it looks.

Even “clean” drinking water that flows from the tap isn’t what most of us would think of as clean. It’s traveled through miles of pipeline, picking up contaminants, pesticides and industrial run-off along the way. It’s been disinfected with potential carcinogens like chlorine, ammonia and or chloramines, then “fortified” with fluoride. While disinfection is a necessary evil — without it, water-borne illnesses would be a constant problem — drinking, showering and bathing every day with this chemical brew is a lousy idea.

No. Seriously. Your water is funky.

Problem is, most of us don’t have a clue about the chemicals and contaminants in our water, nor do we know their long-term effects. We trust that everything is OK, but it’s not. In fact, the Environmental Working Group spent three years investigating the country’s drinking water and the results were jaw-dropping. They found that roughly 85% of the population was using tap water laced with over 300 contaminants, many with unknown long-term effects and more than half of which aren’t even regulated by the EPA. Add to the mix an ever-growing list of new chemical compounds that come online just about every day and well, the waters only get murkier.

Bottled water isn't better, cleaner, or good for the earth.

Let me be blunt: there’s just no good reason to drink bottled water — and if you’re one of those folks who buys it by the case, I beg you to stop. Bottled water is virtually unregulated, expensive, and even the EPA says it’s not necessarily safer than tap. It’s also insanely wasteful — an estimated three liters of water is needed to produce just one liter, and roughly 17 million barrels of oil is required to produce all those bottles, according to The Pacific Institute. What’s worse, roughly 2/3rds of those bottles wind up in the ocean and in landfills, polluting and poisoning waters and wildlife.

Brew your own – with the help of water filtration systems.

So, how to tamp down the bad stuff in your brew? The best way to go is a water filtration system. For starters, look for one that’s certified by the NSF, an independent, non-profit group that tests and verifies the contaminant reducing abilities of water filters. Next, you’ll need to determine how far you’re willing to go, based on your needs and budget. Ideally, whole-house filtration systems are an excellent option, but they’re not always feasible. If whole-house filtration isn’t appropriate for your home, then I recommend investing in individual drinking water and shower filter units.

Tap into your tap.

For drinking water, there are different ways to go, with the three simplest options being under-the-counter filters, countertop filters and pitcher systems:

Under-the-counters are great because they’re tucked away out of sight and receive very high marks for filtration. However, the initial purchase price plus cost per gallon can be a bit higher than the other options, and there is some installation involved.·
Countertop filters use water pressure to force water through the filtration process, which helps make water healthier and tastier, removing more contaminants than standard pitcher systems. Countertop systems require minimal installation (a small hose, but no permanent fixtures), and take up only few inches of counter space.·
Water pitchers work well for the space-challenged because they’re portable, need no installation, fit easily in the fridge and are available on just about every street corner. They do a decent job of filtering out some of the major contaminants, but generally not as many as under-the-counter and countertop versions. And while the initial investment is small, filters need frequent replacement which boosts the cost per gallon over other methods. My favorite pitcher (and the one we use in my office) is the Aquasana Powered Water Filtration System.
Don’t bathe in chemicals.

Your morning shower should not include daily exposure to chlorine, carcinogens and vaporized chemical contaminants being absorbed into your skin and breathed into your lungs. Without a shower filter, it does.

A few simple tips to cut exposure:

Shorten your showers
Turn down the temperature a bit so pores are less open to absorbing contaminants
Install a shower filter (most importantly)
Clean up your act, but kick the tires first.

Water filtration is a simple, no-brainer way to support your health by preventing toxic chemicals and carcinogens from entering your body – and everyone should do it. Before you invest though, check out The Environmental Working Group’s helpful Water Filter Buying Guide to learn more about the options that will work best for your specific needs.

My secret water weapon.

My favorite filters, which I recommend to my patients (and the ones I personally use) are from Aquasana. They remove much of the bad stuff without stripping the water of beneficial minerals such as calcium, magnesium and potassium and they are NSF-certified.

I’ll drink to that!

Saturday, April 06, 2019

Sandy mayor apologises for water crisis, wants input on fluoride

Salt Lake County Health Department Employee Ron Lund takes water samples to be analyzed from homes in the effected area in Sandy on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. (Photo: Silas Walker / Deseret News)
SANDY — Mayor Kurt Bradburn is apologizing again for the city of Sandy’s water crisis in a post on the SandyNow! website. But the mayor also wants to hear from the public on whether they should keep adding fluoride to the water supply.
Sandy city leaders have been heavily criticized since February when they waited a week to let most residents know about a fluoride spill that caused elevated levels of copper and lead to seep into the water supply.
“This circumstance has elevated the discussion about whether or not fluoride should still be added to our water system. Like other local cities, Sandy has complied with the law, voted on by citizens in the early 2000s, to add fluoride in our water system. I would like to continue this dialogue with citizens in a forthcoming town hall this year,” Bradburn wrote in his post.
Bradburn also admitted that there’s been tension between him and the City Council, but says they are working “tirelessly” to restore public trust. They have also hired third-party investigators to figure out what happened and study the city’s response.
Subsequent testing showed no elevated levels of lead or copper in the water once the system was repaired.

Friday, April 05, 2019



Don't remember seeing this video before but worth seeing again if we did.

Thursday, April 04, 2019

F.AN. Newsletter

On Tuesday, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a press releaseannouncing a new proposal to lower the maximum level of fluoride that can be added to bottled water, from 0.8 ppm down to 0.7 ppm. The reduction of 0.1 ppm is FDA’s effort to help reduce rampant dental fluorosis. This change does not lower the allowable level of naturally occurring fluoride in bottled water.
The FDA has invited the public, industry, and "stakeholders" to submit comments on its proposal on or before June 3, 2019.  For information and instructions on how to submit a comment, visit the Federal Register.
In response to the FDA's proposal, CNN published a good article (see below) quoting the Fluoride Action Network's Research Director, Chris Neurath, and raising important questions about recent studies on fluoride's neurotoxicity.  The discussion in the article put the issue into context: not on dental fluorosis, but on fluoride’s neurotoxicity.  Parts of CNN's article has been re-published by countless media outlets across North America and around the world, including in USA Today and the UK's Daily Mail.  Click here to see an updated archive of these articles.

FDA PROPOSES NEW FLUORIDE STANDARD FOR BOTTLED WATER,
BUT SOME SAY IT’S STILL TOO HIGH
By: Susan Scutti, CNN
The US Food and Drug Administration is proposing a lower concentration level standard for fluoride in bottled water, yet some scientists and environmental groups believe that the proposed limit is still too high and poses a danger to human health.
If finalized, the new regulation would lower allowable levels of fluoride in domestically packaged and imported bottled water to 0.7 milligrams per liter, a slight reduction from the current standard of 0.8 milligrams per liter allowed by the FDA.
The proposed standard would apply only to bottled water with added fluoride. It would not affect allowable levels of fluoride in bottled water that may contain fluoride from source water.
Dental health
The FDA’s proposed rule aligns with a 2015 recommendation from the US Public Health Service, part of the US Department of Health and Human Services, that suggests 0.7 milligrams per liter is the optimal fluoride concentration for community water systems that add fluoride.
The new rule “is based on findings from evolving research on optimal concentrations of fluoride that balances fluoride’s benefits in preventing tooth decay with its risk of causing dental fluorosis, a condition most often characterized by white patches on teeth,” the FDA said in its statement. Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in too much fluoride over a long period when adult teeth are forming under the gums.
But some scientists’ concerns extend far beyond fluorosis.
“Given that fluoride can damage brain development, I would recommend that the maximum fluoride concentration in bottled water be kept at a lower level than 0.7 mg/L,”Dr. Philippe Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, wrote in an email.
Christopher Neurath, research director of the American Environmental Health Studies Project, which is connected to the Fluoride Action Network, an environmental advocacy group, said “currently, there are rapidly increasing scientific studies showing neurotoxicity to fluoride,” with research showing a direct link between children’s IQ and their level of fluoride exposure in the womb: “That is our largest concern.”
Behavioral and cognitive health effects
Morteza Bashash, an assistant professor in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, found higher fluoride levels as measured in urine samples of pregnant women are associated with both lower IQ and increased risk of ADHD among children in Mexico.
Specifically, Bashash found a drop in childrens’ scores on intelligence tests for every 0.5 milligram-per-liter increase in fluoride exposure beyond 0.8 milligrams per liter detected in a pregnant mother’s urine. It is not clear whether this is research applicable to the US population, he told CNN.
In Mexico, for example, the government delivers cavity-reducing fluoride by adding it to salt, not water (since many people avoid drinking tap water).
Still, his research findings were “based on the true measurement of fluoride absorbed in the body.” And a Canadian study presented at a conference last year and studies conducted in China showed IQ losses as related to fluoride levels within a similar order of magnitude.
Due to similar fluoride sources, regulations and diet, Canada’s findings of urine levels are likely similar to American urine levels, said Bashash.
Neurath trusts that both the Mexican and Canadian study results would generally apply to the US since “urine fluoride is best measure of total fluoride intake.”
Canadian data from the past 15 years has shown that women living in cities with fluorinated water supplies had “almost double” urine fluoride concentrations levels as women living in non-fluorinated cities. “Drinking water fluoride is the major source of fluoride for these women,” he said.
The effect of prenatal exposure to fluoride on IQ are “very large,” Neurath believes. “And on a population basis, that’s very concerning.”
Proposed rule may not be adequate 
Neurath himself published a study of dental fluorosis this year, based on National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, which found a “dramatic increase in fluorosis” over results from a decade ago. (The study, though published in a peer-reviewed journal, is co-authored by an attorney representing the Fluoride Action Network in legal action regarding regulation of fluoridation chemicals by the US Environmental Protection Agency.)
More than 30% of adolescents in the study showed moderate to severe dental fluorosis (an additional 35% of children showed lesser signs of the condition), “a huge increase” over a survey conducted about a decade prior, Neurath said. He believes that the proposed standard is unlikely to reduce dental fluorosis to acceptable levels.
However, he has a bigger concern. “Dental fluorosis is a visible sign of overexposure to fluoride, but there are other nonvisible signs and adverse health effects that are much more serious,” Neurath said based on the work of Bashash and Grandjean.
Grandjean’s work, which was funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. “Our review of studies from China and our own field study is in accordance with a recent study by US researchers carried out in Mexico that elevated exposure to fluoride during pregnancy is associated with toxicity to brain development.
“Given that fluoride is added to toothpaste to secure that the enamel surface of the teeth is properly protected against caries, there is no need to supplement the dietary fluoride intake,” he said.
Alternatively, Bashash said fluoride in drinking water is considered one of the “biggest public health victories” in preventing cavities. While his job as a scientist is to study a given topic, It is the job of policymakers to come up with the overall understanding of what’s necessary. The FDA looks “at the big picture” by gathering the evidence and evaluating the pros and cons based on national priorities. “This has been a hot topic for 60 years.”
Linda Birnbaum, director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, explained that a “large, cross-government working group” looked at the data available in 2010 to 2011 and concluded that 0.7 mg/L was the appropriate level of fluoride concentration in drinking water, one that “balances protection from dental caries while limiting the risk from dental fluorosis.”
The institute has funded studies that explore other health effects, she said, “and we are looking at the information in a systematic review now.”
The International Bottled Water Association, a trade group, said it supports the FDA proposal to revise the standard of quality for fluoride added to bottled water.
“Most companies are well below” the newly proposed limit, according to Jill Culora, a spokeswoman for the association. “The proposed rule takes into account the many sources of fluoride in people’s diets and will further reduce the risk of dental fluorosis, while still providing an optimal level of fluoride to help prevent tooth decay.”
Cavities are not the only concern, said Neurath: “The proposed rule is not adequate.”