.comment-link {margin-left:.6em;}

UK Against Fluoridation

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Aluminium DOES cause Alzheimer's

Aluminium DOES cause Alzheimer's: Expert says new findings confirm the metal plays a role in the devastating brain disease


  • Chris Exley is a professor in bioinorganic chemistry based at Keele University
  • A link between between aluminium and Alzheimer’s has existed for many years
  • But a lack of evidence has caused the scientific community to remain unsure
  • However, his new research confirms the metal plays a role in cognitive decline 
A link between aluminium and Alzheimer's disease has long existed.
But many scientists says there is not enough evidence to blame the metal, used by thousands for everyday purposes to cook and store food. 
However, Professor Chris Exley, from Keele University, says his latest research confirms it does indeed play a role in cognitive decline.
Here, in a piece for medical-blogging website The Hippocratic Post, he reveals the findings from his latest study. 

In support of our quantitative data, we have also used a recently developed and fully validated method of fluorescence microscopy to provide stunning and unequivocal images of aluminium in brain tissue from familial Alzheimer’s disease donors.
Familial Alzheimer’s disease is an early-onset form of the disease with first symptoms occurring as early as 30 or 40 years of age. 
It is extremely rare, perhaps 2-3 per cent of all cases of Alzheimer’s disease. 
Its bases are genetic mutations associated with a protein called amyloid-beta, a protein which has been heavily linked with the cause of all forms of Alzheimer’s disease.

Individuals with familial Alzheimer’s disease produce more amyloid beta and the onset of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are much earlier in life.
This new research may suggest that these genetic predispositions to early onset Alzheimer’s disease are linked in some way to the accumulation of aluminium in brain tissue.
Ageing is the main risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and aluminium accumulates in human brain tissue with ageing. 
Environmental or occupational exposure to aluminium results in higher levels of aluminium in human brain tissue and an early onset form of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. 
The genetic predispositions which are used to define familial or early-onset Alzheimer’s disease also predispose individuals to higher levels of brain aluminium at a much younger age.
Aluminium is accepted as a known neurotoxin, for example being the cause of dialysis encephalopathy, and its accumulation in human brain tissue at any age can only contribute to any ongoing disease state or toxicity.
We should take all possible precautions to reduce the accumulation of aluminium in our brain tissue through our everyday activities and we should start to do this as early in our lives as possible.

And they put it into the water as part of the cleaning process.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home