.comment-link {margin-left:.6em;}

UK Against Fluoridation

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Teens have enough fizzy drinks a year to fill a bath

Cancer Research UK said teenagers were taking in three times the recommended sugar limit of 30g a day from food and drinks, with their main source of sugar coming from drinks
Research finds average 11 to 18-year-old consumes 234 cans a year. Cancer Research UK said teenagers drink over 77 litres of sugary liquid. Even younger children are also drinking vast amounts of sugary drinks.Teenagers taking in three times the recommended sugar limit of 30g a day.
The Government announced plans to introduce a sugar tax on some drinks
Teenagers consume the equivalent of a bathtub of sugary drinks every year, according to research published today.
Cancer Research UK found that the average child aged between 11 and 18 consumes four and a half cans of sugary drinks a week, or 234 cans a year.
This is the equivalent of more than 77 litres of sugary liquid – and just eight cans short of filling a small bathtub. An adult taking a bath uses an average of about 80 litres of water.
Worryingly, even younger children are also drinking vast amounts of sugar-packed drinks. The research, based on National Diet and Nutrition Survey data, found four to ten-year-olds drank the equivalent of almost half a bathtub annually. They consume just over two cans a week, or nearly 111 cans a year.
And even toddlers aged between 18 months and three years old are drinking 1.3 cans of sugary drinks a week, or just under 70 a year.
Cancer Research UK said teenagers were taking in three times the recommended sugar limit of 30g a day from food and drinks, with their main source of sugar coming from drinks. Children under five should have no more than 19g of sugar per day, but many consume twice that.
Excessive sugar consumption leads to childhood obesity, which can cause a host of health problems including heart disease and diabetes.
In March, the Government announced plans to introduce a sugar tax on some drinks but has come under fire for ‘watering down’ its child obesity strategy.......


Do you believe the sugar industry might have a strong influence on how the NHS tackle the medical problems associated with sugar?

0 Comments:

Post a Comment



Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home