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UK Against Fluoridation

Monday, November 30, 2015

MPs back call for sugar tax

MPs back call for sugar tax: They demand 20% levy for fizzy drinks, blitz on junk food deals AND crackdown on Coco Pops monkey
They called for a ban on ‘guilt lanes’ in supermarkets and high street stores
MPs said labels should state how many teaspoons of sugar were in items
Figures last week showed that a third of children are overweight or obese
TV chef Jamie Oliver called for a sugar tax and clearer labelling last month
By SOPHIE BORLAND, HEALTH CORRESPONDENT FOR THE DAILY MAIL IN CHIAGO
A sugar tax must be slapped on fizzy drinks and supermarkets should be banned from selling discounted junk food to tackle the child obesity crisis, MPs say today.
In a major report, the Health Select Committee said ministers should also introduce a ban on TV adverts for unhealthy brands being screened before 9pm, especially during family shows.
It said the Government must not take the easy option of relying on health education campaigns and promoting exercise.
Instead, the MPs called for graphic warnings on fizzy drinks saying how many spoonfuls of sugar a single serving contains.
They want a 20 per cent sugar tax on soft drinks, which a coalition of 19 medical bodies and charities is also calling for in a separate report today.
The reports will put pressure on ministers to act following alarming figures about the rise of childhood obesity. The Health Select Committee calls for:
A 20 per cent sugar tax on fizzy and soft drinks;
A ban on ‘guilt lanes’ in supermarkets and high street stores which tempt customers with treats just before the tills;
Tough controls on ‘buy one get one free’ style deals on junk food and fizzy drinks;
A 9pm watershed for TV adverts for unhealthy brands especially during The X Factor on ITV and football matches;
A crackdown on cartoon characters such as the Kellogg’s Coco Pops monkey and the Dairylea cow being used to target children;
Compulsory labels stating how many teaspoons of sugar there are in everyday items; and
An end to supersize portions and free drinks refills at restaurants, fast food chains and cinemas.


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